About Liz Whittemore

Liz grew up in northern Connecticut and was memorizing movie dialogue from Shirley Temple to A Nightmare on Elm Street at a very early age. She will watch just about any film all the way through (no matter how bad) just to prove a point. A loyal New Englander, a lover of Hollywood, and true inhabitant of The Big Apple.

Review: RSVP yes to ‘PLUS ONE’

SYNOPSIS:  Long-time friends Alice and Ben find themselves in that inevitable year that all late 20-somethings experience—in which seemingly every person they know gets married—and agree to be one another’s plus ones as they power through an endless parade of insufferable weddings. One summer I went to 6 weddings. It was equal parts fun, exhausting, and expensive. We learned who Read More →

Review: ‘Changeland’ travels well.

CHANGLEAND Need to get away? Seth Green‘s directorial debut, Changeland, might be just the ticket. The film stars a gaggle of actors that first made a name for themselves in some of my favorite films and television shows; Clueless, Can’t Hardly Wait, Home Alone, and Buffy The Vampire Slayer. Guys, Macaulay Culkin is in this. And he’s sheer perfection. So Read More →

Review: ‘A Violent Separation’

In Theaters and On-Demand May 17, 2019 Directed by: Kevin and Michael Goetz (A Scenic Route) In a quiet midwestern town, Norman Young (Brenton Thwaites) is faced with an impossible decision; arrest his older brother Ray (Ben Robson) for murder or help him cover it up. Norman chooses family. As the ensuing investigation withers, neither of the brothers are prepared for the weight Read More →

Review: ‘We Have Always Lived In The Castle’ in theaters and VOD today.

WE HAVE ALWAYS LIVED IN THE CASTLE  A film by Stacie Passon based on the book “We Have Always Lived in the Castle” by Shirley Jackson Starring Taissa Farmiga, Alexandra Daddario,  Sebastian Stan, and Crispin Glover SYNOPSIS: Merricat lives with her sister Constance and her Uncle Julian. The trio are survivors of an arsenic poisoning that killed everyone else in Read More →

Tribeca Film Festival 2019 Review: ‘Blow The Man Down’

Blow The Man Down While grieving for the loss of their mother, the Connolly Sisters suddenly find they have a crime to cover up, leading them deep into the underbelly of their salty Maine fishing village. Growing up in a small New England town, I have a full appreciation for the glorious specificity in Blow The Man Down. From the Read More →

Tribeca Film Festival 2019 Podcast Interview: Jeremy Gardner, Christian Stella, and Brea Grant share all the gory and gorgeous details of ‘Something Else’.

Something Else Podcast Something Else was one of the most unique selections in this year’s festival. Both a monster movie and a love story, the film’s deliberate structure is a standout all on its own. The writing is fresh and funny and the use of light makes it a joy to watch. There are brilliantly theatrical moments. I believe this Read More →

Tribeca Film Festival 2019 Review: ‘Bunker Burger’ and ‘The Neighbor’s Window’, two shorts that keep you watching.

Bunker Burger The members of an underground, post-apocalyptic bunker invite a psychologist from the radioactive and chaotic surface to audition for a place to live among them. This short has everything you’re looking for in any film; suspense, distinct style, consuming plot, brilliant performances. There is not a hair out of place with this dark comedy. It is the perfect Read More →

Tribeca Film Festival 2019 Review: ‘Charlie Says’ flips the script on the Manson girls.

  Charlie Says Charlie Says, directed by masterful filmmaker Mary Harron and written by Guinevere Turner, tells the familiar story through fresh eyes—those of Manson’s most devoted girls, van Houten (Game of Thrones’ Hannah Murray), Patricia Krenwinkel (Sosie Bacon), and Susan Atkins (Marianne Rendón). Thanks to a devoted prison educator who slowly draws the women out from years of a madman’s mesmerizing and abusive Read More →

Tribeca Film Festival 2019 Review: ‘ONLY’ in an emotional gut punch worth waiting for.

ONLY Will (Leslie Odom, Jr.) and Eva (Freida Pinto) seem destined for a storybook life together, so pure and supportive is their mutual love. But their alone time is suddenly interrupted when Eva’s roommate, Carolyn (Tia Hendricks), bursts through the door and collapses as torrents of mysterious ash fall from the sky. During a chaotic trip to the hospital, Will Read More →

Review: ‘CLARA’ has an appeal that is written in the stars.

Starring: Troian Bellisario (“Pretty Little Liars”) and Patrick J. Adams (“Suits”) Written & Directed by Akash Sherman (The Rocket List) CLARA tells the story of Isaac Bruno (Patrick J. Adams), an astronomer consumed by the search for life beyond Earth. Convinced that the universe is a dark and lonely place, Isaac meets Clara (Troian Bellisario), an artist who shares his fascination for the wonders of Read More →

Tribeca Film Festival 2019 Review: SHORTS: WTF

SHORTS: WTF These films were curated especially for late-night. Playing in this program: Twist No choice but to walk home alone, Hannah (Helena Howard) sees an opportunity for a ride, but others see an opportunity in her. With a well-built tension familiar to any young woman, Twist leaves much to the terrifying imagination, making it all the more frightening. Beautiful Read More →

Tribeca Film Festival 2019 Review: ‘Something Else’ is aptly named.

SOMETHING ELSE The Midnight section at this year’s Tribeca Film Festival gives us Something Else. A story about Hank, whose longtime girlfriend Abby abruptly leaves him, but with a lot of extra flair in the plot. The editing is spectacular. Crisp still camera images set against a bleakly lit Hank, make for a perfect early jump scare. Then you catch Read More →

Tribeca Film Festival 2019 Review: ‘Aamis’ serves up a shocking treat.

AAMIS (RAVENING) Food and romance seem to go hand in hand. Think about the traditional date. It usually revolves around dinner or coffee. Food is the ultimate form of aphrodisiac. Though, both food and love can spoil quickly. In Aamis, Tribeca’s only Indian feature film this year,  married doctor Niri meets Sumon, a Ph.D. student studying regional meat-eating traditions in Read More →

Tribeca Film Festival 2019 Review: ‘The Gasoline Thieves’

THE GASOLINE THIEVES Poverty and puberty are a dangerous mix for young Lalo. Feeling overwhelming monetary pressure from family and ultimately to impress a girl at school, our young lead dives head first into the deadly game of gas siphoning for cash. Among the chaos of gas price protests and violence, Lalo has no idea the kind of shady dealings Read More →

Tribeca Film Festival 2019 Review: ‘Come To Daddy’ is everything you’d want an Ant Timpson film to be.

COME TO DADDY Elijah Wood plays an emotionally overwhelmed uber hipster attempting to reconnect with his estranged father. Summoned to a secluded home via a mysterious letter from his dad, he finds himself in an unexpected situation. Wood, as always, is vulnerable and funny. I’ll buy anything he’s selling. His body of work is so eclectic and wonderfully bizarre, what’s Read More →

Review: ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ is Terry Gilliam’s fantastic passion project.

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote  Toby (Driver), a cynical advertising director, finds himself trapped in the outrageous delusions of an old Spanish shoe-maker (Pryce) who believes himself to be Don Quixote. In the course of their comic and increasingly surreal adventures, Toby is forced to confront the tragic repercussions of a film he made in his idealistic youth – a Read More →

Review: ‘Making Babies’ brings humor to a delicate subject.

MAKING BABIESWriter/Director: Josh Huber Cast: Eliza Coupe, Steve Howey, Bob Stephenson, Elizabeth Rodriguez, Ed Begley Jr, and the late Glenne Headly Katie and John Kelly (Eliza Coupe and Steve Howey) are ready to settle down and have kids but five years later, all they have to show for their efforts is a mountain of negative pregnancy tests and an increasingly Read More →

Review: ‘The Public’ gives truth to the phrase “knowledge is power”.

THE PUBLIC In “The Public” an unusually bitter Arctic blast has made its way to downtown Cincinnati and the front doors of the public library where the action of the film takes place. At odds with library officials over how to handle the extreme weather event, some homeless patrons turn the building into a shelter for the night by staging an “Occupy” sit in. Read More →

Review: ‘American Relapse’ -The profitability of addiction.

Best Feature Documentary, Rhode Island International Film Festival Best Feature Documentary, Alexandria Film Fest MINT Spirit Award (Top Festival Prize), Montana International Film Festival Best Feature Documentary, Laughlin International Film Festival Best Feature Documentary, Mammoth Film Festival Best Feature Documentary, Other Venice Film Festival Social Awareness Award, Orlando Film Festival Recovering addicts Frankie and Allie spend their lives helping other Read More →

Review: Is ‘Starfish’ a metaphor for grief?

With reality rapidly fraying at the edges, Aubrey finds herself following a string of clues left after the death of her best friend. Clues leading to a mysterious signal that could save the world. Starfish is one hell of a trip. This film boasts one of the coolest soundtracks, some sick CG, outstanding acting, an anime sequence, and one weird ass Read More →