NYFF57: ‘Parasite’ is a wild and exciting ride – new screenings added at Film at Lincoln Center

The hype started to build for Bong Joon Ho’s latest film when it won the Palme D’or at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. I missed it during the festival, and when it was sold out at IFC Center, I was worried I’d have to wait for streaming. Luckily Film at Lincoln Center added more screenings and I attended the 6pm Read More →

New York Film Festival: Movies coming soon to a theater near you (or your favorite device)

Of the 48 films screening at this year’s New York Film Festival (Main Slate, Spotlight on Documentary, Special Events) there are 17 that are either released or will be in the next 6 months. That used to mean they were just coming soon to a cinema screen, but now it could mean it will soon be available for you to Read More →

New York Film Festival Review: ‘The Wild Goose Lake’

The Wild Goose Lake Diao Yinan 2019 China/France 113 minutes Subtitled U.S. Premiere ·  Small-time mob boss Zhou Zenong (the charismatic Hu Ge) is desperate to stay alive after he mistakenly kills a cop and a dead-or-alive reward is put on his head. Chinese director Diao Yinan deftly keeps multiple characters and chronologies spinning, all the while creating an atmosphere Read More →

NYFF 57 review: – Kelly Reichardt’s ‘First Cow’ is a film about male friendship in the early 19th century.

First Cow Kelly Reichardt 2019 USA 122 minutes New York Premiere · Kelly Reichardt once again trains her perceptive and patient eye on the Pacific Northwest, this time evoking an authentically hardscrabble early 19th-century way of life for this tale of a taciturn loner and skilled cook (John Magaro) who has joined a group of fur trappers in Oregon Territory, Read More →

New York Film Festival Review: ‘Sybil’ is chaotic and anything but predictable

What I really enjoyed about Justine Triet’s ‘Sybil’ is the layered stories that are told in real-time alongside flashbacks. The result leaves you with a feeling of unease. Was it happening now or was she remembering? I got a feeling of confusion that was intriguing and captivating. Past and present collide in an increasingly complicated and highly entertaining fashion in Read More →

Review: Paul Dano’s directorial debut ‘Wildlife’ is an instant classic

Wildlife focuses on a struggling family in 1960 and is mainly from the perspective of the 14-year-old son, Joe, played by Australian actor, Ed Oxenbould. At the post-screening Q&A with the director, Paul Dano admits that he only shot in digital because he was worried they’d have to do a lot of takes with a young actor. Turns out, Oxenbould Read More →

New York Film Festival Reviews: ‘A Faithful Man’ & ‘Ash Is The Purest White’

25Two very different films about loyalty played at NYFF this year. A Faithful Man is quintessential French romcom and Ash Is The Purest White is the best of director Jia Zhangke. A Faithful Man is about a couple of lovers torn apart by a pregnancy and brought back together by death. The jokes are witty and performances are stellar. I have adored every NYFF selection starring Louis Read More →

New York Film Festival Review: ‘Non-Fiction’

Juliette Binoche is literally in a New York Film Festival feature every year. This year (and it’s not the first) she appears in two. Non-Fiction is a brilliant and sardonic piece of writing about the state of literature, media, politics, and intimate relationships. Centering around a writer a publisher, an actress, and a campaign manager, the film intertwines affairs and humor. If Aaron Read More →

New York Film Festival Review: ‘In My Room’

The idea of “The Last Man on Earth” is certainly not new, but In My Room takes a look at the scenario from a long game perspective. The opening of the film is visually jarring and in hindsight is a fantastic set up for both our leading man and plot. The world’s population vanishes overnight. The introduction to this is subtle at Read More →

New York Film Festival Review: ‘Long Day’s Journey Into Night’

Long Day’s Journey Into Night is why we go to film festivals. It’s one of those films that people will be talking about for years to come because the audience will either love it or loathe it. There is no denying it’s a visually striking and stylistically over-indulgent noir that goes nowhere and everywhere all at once. Confused? You’re not alone. Read More →

Watch 3 Press Conferences from the New York Film Festival

The Ballad of Buster Scruggs will be available on Netflix in a little over a month on 11/16/18, The Favourite will be in theaters shortly after that on 11/23/18, but High Life hasn’t been announced, so we can only assume 2019. The Ballad of Buster Scruggs North American Premiere Country: USA Here’s something new from the Coen Brothers—an anthology of short films Read More →

3 FREE Talks left to see at the New York Film Festival

Directors Dialogues: Alice Rohrwacher 60 minutes Free and Open to the Public! · Presented by HBO® · Supported by illy Rohrwacher was Film Society of Lincoln Center’s Artist in Residence in 2016, during which time she worked on the script that became the Cannes-awarded drama Happy as Lazzaro, showing in this year’s Main Slate. Join Rohrwacher as she talks about her process bringing Read More →

Willem Dafoe is Vincent Van Gogh in closing film ‘At Eternity’s Gate’ of the New York Film Festival this October

Nominated for Best Film at the Venice Film Festival earlier this year, At Eternity’s Gate (named for a painting of Van Gogh) will close the 56th Annual New York Film Festival. Directed by Julian Schnabel (Diving Bell & the Butterlfy), starring Willem Dafoe as Van Gogh with Rupert Friend and Oscar Isaac. Julian Schnabel’s ravishingly tactile and luminous new film takes Read More →

New York Film Festival to open with 18th Century romp from the director of ‘The Lobster’ – Yorgos Lanthimos

Early 18th century. England is at war with the French. Nevertheless, duck racing and pineapple eating are thriving. A frail Queen Anne (Olivia Colman) occupies the throne and her close friend Lady Sarah (Rachel Weisz) governs the country in her stead while tending to Anne’s ill health and a mercurial temper. When a new servant Abigail (Emma Stone) arrives, her Read More →

NYFF review: ‘The Meyerowitz Stories (New & Selected)’ – on Netflix 10/13

You may remember that this was one of two films that Netflix screened at the Cannes Film Festival and it caused quite a controversy. Meyerowitz Stories is one of the two films in the competition — the other being Bong Joon-ho’s Okja— that Netflix has brought to Cannes, stirring up controversy, with the fest promising not to screen any films next year that Read More →

16 New York Film Festival movies coming to theaters soon

The Florida Project Description: A six-year-old girl (the remarkable Brooklynn Prince) and her two best friends run wild on the grounds of a week-by-week motel complex on the edge of Orlando’s Disney World. Meanwhile, her mother (talented novice Bria Vinaite) desperately tries to cajole the motel manager (an ever-surprising Willem Dafoe) to turn a blind eye to the way she Read More →

New York Film Festival 55 Review: ‘The Other Side of Hope’ is subtle, quirky & timely

Finland’s master of deadpan comedy, Aki Kaurismäki (‘Lights in the Dusk’, ‘Le Havre’), returns with the story of an unlikely friendship between a Syrian asylum seeker and a middle-aged Finnish restaurant owner. Winner of the Berlin Silver Bear for Best Director, it’s a beautiful, timely film from one of the world’s leading auteurs. Khaled (Sherwan Haji) arrives at the port Read More →

New York Film Festival 55 Review: ‘The Florida Project’ shines.

Set over one summer, the film follows precocious 6-year-old Moonee as she courts mischief and adventure with her ragtag playmates and bonds with her rebellious but caring mother, all while living in the shadows of Disney World. Sean Baker‘s The Florida Project is easily in my top 5 films at this year’s NYFF. The entire film is so organic with Read More →

New York Film Festival 55 Review: ‘Hall of Mirrors’ exposes investigative journalism at it’s finest

I’m not quite sure which is more interesting: the life of Edward Jay Epstein or the stories he investigates. Add to that an original documentary style and Hall of Mirrors turns into an accessible, artistic, and entertaining documentary. First-time filmmaker sisters, Ena Talakic and Ines Talakic spent four years writing, directing and editing after a chance meeting with Epstein at a party. Rather Read More →

15 U.S. Premieres of the New York Film Festival

A Skin So Soft Description: Studiously observing the world of male bodybuilding, Denis Côté’s A Skin So Soft (Ta peau si lisse) crafts a multifaceted portrait of six latter-day Adonises through the lens of their everyday lives: extreme diets, training regimens, family relationships, and friendships within the community. Capturing the physical brawn and emotional complexity of its subjects with wit Read More →