Review: Hannah Marks explores the growing pains of modern love in ‘Mark,Mary, and Some Other People’

Synopsis:

Mark and Mary, acquaintances from college, run into each other at a drug store as Mary is buying a pregnancy test. The test is negative and the two wind up dating and rapidly falling for each other. Mark has a more traditional view of relationships and Mary’s view is more modern and progressive. They try “ethical non-monogamy” at Mary’s request, and create their own version of an open relationship, while also trying to balance their fledgling careers and friendships. Through a series of ups and downs, Mary starts to realize she’s more traditional than she thought whereas Mark starts to open up and see the world differently through Mary and a polyamorous lens.


“Traditional” relationships structures were created by, well, who knows. Love is weird and complicated, no matter how hard we try. We’re only human. We have urges that are as basic as they come. Anyone who claims to not be attracted to a person outside of their monogamous relationship is a liar. Love is messy and ever-evolving, and writer-director Hannah Marks gets that. Marks popped onto my radar with Banana Split. Her writing is laugh-out-loud-funny and relatable as hell. In her sophomore film, Mark, Mary, and Some Other People, we get the entire emotional spectrum in an hour and a half.

Hayley Law, as Mary, is equal parts bold and down-to-earth. Ben Rosenfield, as Mark, is the definition of charming. I’m not sure he could be more adorable if he tried. Their chemistry with each other, and the rest of this cast, is electric. You have to wonder if any of the dialogue is improvised. It is abundantly clear making this film was a good time.

Mark, Mary, and Some Other People has both nonchalance and honed in emotional palpability. It tackles big issues like communication, the evolution of relationships, and growing up, all with humor and honesty. It’s not pretty or tied up with a bow. Marks understands why that’s important. It’s a peek inside the complexities of human nature. Mark, Mary, and Some Other People is yet another successful notch in her filmmaking belt.


In Theaters and On Demand:

Friday, November 5


Written & Directed By:
Hannah Marks
Produced by:
Stephen Braun, Jon Lullo, Brendan Walter, Jonathan Duffy, Kelly Williams, Pete Williams, and Hannah Marks
Executive Produced By:
Stephen Braun
Starring:

Ben Rosenfield, Hayley Law, Nik Dodani, Odessa A’zion, Matt Shively, Sofia Bryant, Maggie Wheeler, Joe Lo Truglio, Haley Ramm with Gillian Jacobs and Lea Thompson


Review: ‘Banana Split’ is the sweet treat we all need right now.

SYNOPSIS: April (Hannah Marks) has spent the last two years of high school in a relationship with Nick (Dylan Sprouse), from first frantic make-out session to final tear-stained breakup. In the aimless summer between graduation and college, the newly single April mends her heartbreak by striking up an unexpected friendship with an unlikely candidate: Nick’s new girlfriend, Clara (Liana Liberato).

Writers Hannah Marks and Joey Power have treated us to a genuine and hilarious look at female relationships. Minus the obvious current technology, this is a story that easily spans any generational gap. The dialogue is quippy and whip-smart. Somewhere between Dawson’s Creek and any John Hughes film. (Clearly, I’m dating myself here.) It’s laugh out loud funny the entire time. It reminded me of last year’s Booksmart. Same intoxicating energy.

Dylan Sprouse is back, ladies and gentlemen. This role allows him to prove that he (and not just his brother Cole) is the teen heartthrob of the moment. His innate ability to both seduce you and put you at ease with his nonchalance is the stuff of gold. Luke Spencer Roberts as Ben is awesome. You might think he’s going to be the sidekick but he is the sanity seeker with a wicked sense of comic timing. More of him everywhere, please.

Liana Liberato as Clara is every cool, confident girl we wanted to be in high school, but really nice. Her free-spiritedness is an awesome foil for April’s darker, sardonic tendencies. But she is equally as sharp. Hannah Marks, as April, is the quirky, indie girl we also wanted to be or actually were but didn’t know it until now. Bravo for her ability to successfully tackle the trifecta of executive producer, star, and writer. I cannot wait to see what she does next.

The chemistry between Liberato and Marks is magic. It’s that feeling we all have with our best friend; that rapid-fire back and forth that is way funnier when brimming with inside jokes. The most interesting part of this script is watching the pure development of a female relationship that mirrors the ups and downs of a romantic one. The soundtrack is fantastic, mixed with some fun countdown animation, Banana Split is hands down one of the best comedies of 2020.

 

Vertical Entertainment will release the comedy, BANANA SPLIT in Theaters, On Digital and On-Demand on March 27, 2020.

  BANANA SPLIT stars Hannah Marks (After Everything, “Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency”), Liana Liberato (If I Stay, “Light As A Feather”), Dylan Sprouse (“The Suite Life of Zack & Cody,” Big Daddy) and Addison Riecke (Nickelodeon’s “The Thundermans,” The Beguiled). The film marks the feature directorial debut of indie cinematographer Benjamin Kasulke (Safety Not Guaranteed, Laggies.) Marks co-wrote the film alongside Joey Power (After Everything) who were both executive producers on the film as well.

SXSW 2020 review: ‘I Used To Go Here’ is an emotional second chance.

I Used To Go Here

Synopsis:

Following the launch of her new novel, 35-year-old writer Kate Conklin (Gillian Jacobs) is invited to speak at her alma mater by her mentor and former professor (Jemaine Clement). After accepting the invitation, Kate finds herself deeply enmeshed in the lives of an eccentric group of college students.

Gillian Jacobs is charming as ever as a woman whose life isn’t quite stacking up with the fiction she has spun. She comes face to face, literally, with everything from her college experience; her house, her coursework, her professor, and fellow students. After a reading from her debut novel, she is confronted by her own shortcomings as she becomes entangled in the drama of current students. The script allows her to let her guard down and accept the dark. Failure allows her to grow.

While certain plot points feel like a cliche rom-com, there is nothing wrong with that. I Used To Go Here is a comfort film for people who feel stalled. Finger wagging Gen Xer’s (like myself) will instantly connect with Jacobs. Ironically longing to be in her shoes for a few days. It will remind us all of the hope and fearlessness of our youth. It’s a motivating, genuinely funny look as adulthood. Besides Jacobs continuing to be a lovely and heartfelt actor, her castmates also offer a plethora of laughs and light. Jemaine Clement is always hilarious and this is no exception. Sometimes, the more sincere he tries to be the funnier I fond him. This is a total compliment. I find him easy to watch and connect with.

Josh Wiggins as Hugo is a breath of fresh air. His nonchalance and enthusiasm are a joy to watch. Hannah Marks is everything we need her to be; ambitious, moody, and ultimately vulnerable. Brandon Daley is one of the most hilarious characters in this film as Tall Brandon. His confidence and comic timing are pure magic. Lastly, Zoe Chao plays Laura, Kate’s best friend that is living vicariously through sporadic phone calls. She is both a voice of reason and a reliable one-liner spouter. I’m going to need way more of her in the future, please and thank you.

While we’re not breaking any ground with I Used To Go Here, I still really loved it. I lived in it. Sometimes you just need a well written, well-acted film that universally gets you. Congratulations to writer/director Kris Rey and cast for leaving us with a feel-good gem.

I USED TO GO HERE— Directed and Written by Kris Rey

SXSW 2020 Official Selection – Narrative SpotlightWorld Premiere — Acquisition

Starring Gillian Jacobs, Jemaine Clement, Josh Wiggins, Hannah Marks, Zoe Chao, Jorma Taccone, Forrest Goodluck