Review: ‘OLD HENRY’ is a stunningly performed western.

OLD HENRY

Old Henry is an action-Western about a widowed farmer and his son who warily take in a mysterious, injured man with a satchel of cash. When a posse of men claiming to be the law come for the money, the farmer must decide whom to trust. Defending against a siege of his homestead, he reveals a talent for gunslinging that surprises everyone, calling his true identity into question.


Writer-director Potsy Ponciroli‘s screenplay harkens back to classic westerns. There’s plenty of gunslinging, horseback, and trouble, for genre fans. It’s ceaselessly engaging, overflowing with slick writing, striking natural lighting, and insanely fantastic performances. There’s an underlying complexity that history fans will fawn over. Ponciroli has given audiences something special.

Trace Adkins, as Henry’s brother-in-law, Al, is a wonderful balance of welcoming and spitfire. He owned every moment of screen time. Stephen Dorff is an unmistakable villain. You’ll loathe him. That’s a compliment to the work he does. Scott Haze plays Curry with confidence that counters Nelson to a tee. He shared the screen with Nelson in his breakthrough role in Child Of God. Here, he’s just as intense. Tim Blake Nelson gives a seemingly effortless and pitch-perfect performance. His unflappable conviction at every turn is award-worthy stuff. The scenes between Haze and Nelson are like watching a chess match. You’ll be mesmerized.

There is a smartly laid-out trail of clues, so keep a sharp eye out. Old Henry has a climax so legendary you’ll want to watch it again. It’s destined to be a classic. You can find Old Henry in theaters, beginning today. And, if you’re in the New York City area, our colleague, Joey Magidson at Awards Radar, will be hosting a few Q&As with Tim Blake Nelson! You can find all the details below.



Coming to Theaters on October 1

Written and Directed by Potsy Ponciroli

Starring:
Tim Blake Nelson (O Brother, Where Art Thou, The Ballard of Buster Scruggs)
Scott Haze (Jurassic World: Dominion, Venom)
Gavin Lewis (“Little Fires Everywhere”, “NCIS: Los Angeles”)
Trace Adkins (Deep Water Horizon, The Lincoln Lawyer)
Stephen Dorff (Blade, Immortals)

RT: 99 minutes


Review: ‘Don’t Go’ is mysterious and visually delicious.


PRESENTS

OPENS IN THEATERS TODAY!

Synopsis:
Somewhere between dreams and reality lies a terrifying hidden truth… Reeling from the shock of their young daughter’s death, Ben (Stephen Dorff) and Hazel (Melissa George) attempt to restart their lives in a picturesque seaside village. But when the girl begins appearing to Ben in a haunting recurring dream, he becomes convinced that she is attempting to make contact from beyond the grave—and that his nightmare may hold the key to bringing her back to life. As Hazel begins to fear for her husband’s sanity, they are each drawn into a mystery far beyond their understanding. This tantalizing psychological puzzle plumbs the depths of grief and guilt as it unravels the dark secret at its center.

Don’t Go boasts so visually striking sequences. Using overly saturated light and tones to express memory or dream states, makes it a feast for the eyes. The reoccurring imagery is clever and precise. The story is one of a lost marriage exacerbated by the sudden death of this couple’s young daughter. When Dorff’s character convinces himself that he can bring her back from the beyond, his buried guilt drives him, and everyone around him to their breaking point. With great performances from stars Stephen Dorff, Melissa George, and Aoibhinn McGinnity Don’t Go still remained a mystery to me after watching and rewatching the final 20 minutes. I’m not quite sure what was real but if that was the intent, then plot well laid out. The simple fact that I’m still attempting to untangle it says a lot about Ronan Blaney‘s writing. You can catch Don’t Go In theaters today. Check out the trailer below!

A FILM BY DAVID GLEESON

WRITTEN BY:
Ronan Blaney (The Back of Beyond, Love Bites)

STARRING:
Stephen Dorff (“True Detective”, Blade, Somewhere, Public Enemies)
Melissa George (“Grey’s Anatomy”, “The Good Wife,” “In Treatment”)
Aoibhinn McGinnity (“Quarry”, Love/Hate)
Simon Delaney (The Conjuring 2, Delivery Man)
Charlotte Bradley (The Boys and Girl from County Clare, The Gift)
Luke Griffin (Band of Brothers, Pure Mule)