Review: ‘CAT DADDIES’ is a surprisingly purrfect family film.

Man has found a new best friend: Tora, Pickles, Lucky, Zulu, Toodles, Flame, and GoalKitty. These are just some of the lovable feline stars of director Mye Hoang’s debut documentary film CAT DADDIES. A heartwarming and tender portrait of a diverse group of men whose lives have been forever changed by their love of cats, CAT DADDIES takes us on an inspiring journey all across the United States during the challenging early days of the COVID-19 pandemic when people desperately needed hope and companionship. These nine “cat dads” come from all walks of life – a firefighter, a truck driver, a Hollywood stuntman, an ad executive turned cat rescuer, a police officer, a software engineer, an actor/Instagram influencer, a school teacher and an undocumented and disabled immigrant living on the streets of New York City. They couldn’t be any more different, but each of them has a compelling story to tell and share an unconditional love for their beloved cats. A refreshing and timely exploration of modern masculinity, CAT DADDIES shows us how being a “cat person” has no gender, and that the unlikely bond between man and cat is here to stay.

A bit eccentric, incredibly fun, and entirely sweet, CAT DADDIES spotlights male cat owners and their feline friends. Following the lives of nine cat dads, Mye Hoang‘s documentary film shows audiences the unconditional love between owner and pet and subtly dismantles outdated stereotypes about masculinity and cat ownership.

David and Lucky live in the streets of NYC. A former construction worker originally from the country of Georgia. After rescuing an injured kitten and the ASPCA ignoring his pleas, David and the kitten that survived are now inseparable. David has Cerebral Palsy, and his medical needs are a roadblock to his desire to provide the best life for Lucky. Their story is the greatest through line in CAT DADDIES. We follow their journeys through David’s surgeries and Lucky’s adjustment into temporary care with a friend.

Tora the Trucker Cat, truck driver David, and girlfriend Destiny travel together from state to state for months. Tora has a leash to explore national parks and a seat in David’s backpack when she needs a break. Tora has become the focus of David’s newfound photography skills. She’s a bit of a celebrity that’s allowed David to express himself in ways he never thought possible.

These are just two men featured in the film, but their relationships speak volumes about their feline friends’ impact on their lives. Each story is darling. Filmmaker Mye Hoang creates a beautiful arch of the bond between animals and the men who love them. The doc also brings awareness to the stray cat population and how we can help. You’ll fall in love with these little friends. If you thought you were strictly a “dog person,” think again. I watched the film with my five and six-year-old children, and they were enamored. These kids have been begging for a dog since they were two. CAT DADDIES is here to change minds and capture hearts.


In select theaters beginning October 14th in New York (at Village East by Angelika), followed by Los Angeles (at Laemmle Glendale), Dallas (Angelika Film Center) & San Diego (Reading Cinemas Town Square) on October 21st. The film will then expand into additional theaters/cities later this fall.

About the filmmaker MYE HOANG: 
Mye Hoang is a Los Angeles-based film producer, writer, and director. Her work as a producer includes the award-winning noir thriller MAN FROM RENO (Best Feature, LA Film Festival & Spirit Award nominee 2015) and I WILL MAKE YOU MINE by Lynn Chen (SXSW 2020). Mye has directed several narrative short films that have screened at festivals around the world. Her narrative feature film debut as writer/director, VIETTE (a Vietnamese American coming-of-age story), premiered in 2012 and screened at dozens of film festivals, including the Asian American International Film Festival and Edinburgh Fringe Fest. Mye is also the founder and former Executive Director of the Asian Film Festival of Dallas, and the former Artistic Director of the San Diego Asian Film Festival. She has a BA in Cinema from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, TX where she was born and raised. CAT DADDIES is her first documentary feature.