Tribeca Film Festival 2022 review: ‘An Act Of Worship’ is required viewing.

An Act Of Worship

Reenactments, sit-down interviews, home videos, photos, and intimate storytelling, Tribeca 2022 feature documentary An Act Of Worship highlights the continued pain and persecution of Muslims in America. Thirty years of pivotal historical trauma shape the community, as told through three female activists and those around them. 

The doc addresses the highs and lows through the lens of personal identity from Oklahoma City to the election of President Obama. His presidency felt like a bait and switch. Then came Trump, and we’re all still reeling from that atrocity. 

The continued trauma permeates everyone who practices Islam. The film does not shy away from the implicit bias we’ve come to acknowledge only recently. It addresses racism head-on with honesty. Imagine if the NYPD monitored Christian charities, households, and churches the same way they harass Muslims. White people would lose their minds. 

Hearing the emotional impact on Muslims is undeniably powerful. Listening to these vibrant and hopeful young people alongside their parents is enlightening. These are the stories we must hear in order to connect new generations and old generations. 

I attended Catholic school from first to eighth grade. I am now an agnostic because of this. But, I distinctly remember my father encouraging me to explore other religions if I felt I needed to. I firmly believe that students in the United States should learn about every religion, its origins, and its belief structure to quell fear based on ignorance or propaganda. Multicultural panels and open discussions are imperative to understand that we’re more alike than different, as cliche as it sounds. An Act Of Worship is undeniably a beautiful and important conversation starter. We need more films like this.


Running Time: 83 Minutes

Language: English, Arabic Country: USA

DIRECTOR
Nausheen Dadabhoy
PRODUCER
Sofian Khan, Kristi Jacobson, Heba Elorbany
CINEMATOGRAPHER
Nausheen Dadabhoy
COMPOSER
Mary Kouyoumdjian
EDITOR
Ben Garchar


About Liz Whittemore

Liz grew up in northern Connecticut and was memorizing movie dialogue from Shirley Temple to A Nightmare on Elm Street at a very early age. She will watch just about any film all the way through (no matter how bad) just to prove a point. A loyal New Englander, a lover of Hollywood, and true inhabitant of The Big Apple.