Tribeca Festival 2021 review: ‘Ultrasound’ is a mind-melting film.

Ultrasound

Synopsis: Driving home late at night during a heavy rainstorm, Glen experiences car trouble. Near where his car gets stuck, he spots a house, knocks on the door and is greeted by an oddly friendly middle-aged man, Arthur, and his younger wife, Cyndi. The strange couple pours him a drink, and then more drinks, followed by an unexpected offer that Glen can’t refuse. Elsewhere, a young woman, Katie, is feeling emotionally weighed down by a secret romantic arrangement that feels like a textbook case of gaslighting. And at the same time, in a nondescript research facility, medical professional Shannon begins questioning her role in a bizarre experiment, fearing that she’s doing more harm than good.

When I tell you you’re not ready for Ultrasound, I mean that as a huge compliment because this film is a sci-fi mind melt. Boasting an outstanding cast and incredible writing, this is a film that you’ll want to tell everyone about. Three different stories, all equally mysterious, will reel you in with smartly laid-out breadcrumbs. Between exclamations of “Huh?” and “Wait, what?!” I have no doubt you will be hungry for more.

Vincent Kartheiser plays Glen with both a sense of an “everyman” quality and someone with long lingering PTSD. Chelsea Lopez brings a naivete to Cyndi that is spot on. Breeda Wool as Shannon allows the audience a small window into the insanity of this film. Alongside Bob Stephenson’s nuanced performance as Art, Ultrasound is a ping-pong match of converging stories and characters that will confuse, excite, and melt your brain.

The editing becomes increasingly important as the mystery unravels. Ultrasound is relentlessly twisted. There is so much happening in this script, you have to pay careful attention to it all. Ultrasound is best viewed with no preconceived notions. Throw out everything you think you know and take the ride. Tribeca audiences will eat this up. Ultrasound will keep you baffled long after the credits roll. It demands repeat viewing.

Check out the clip below for a preview:

**WORLD PREMIERE**
CAST: Vincent Kartheiser, Chelsea Lopez, Breeda Wool, Tunde Adebimpe, Rainey Qualley, Chris Gartin, Bob Stephenson
DIRECTOR: Rob Schroeder

Review: ‘Making Babies’ brings humor to a delicate subject.

MAKING BABIESWriter/Director: Josh Huber

Cast: Eliza Coupe, Steve Howey, Bob Stephenson, Elizabeth Rodriguez, Ed Begley Jr, and the late Glenne Headly

Katie and John Kelly (Eliza Coupe and Steve Howey) are ready to settle down and have kids but five years later, all they have to show for their efforts is a mountain of negative pregnancy tests and an increasingly elaborate home micro-brewing rig, which John hopes will launch his company with the help of a new amazing product the gundry md.  As they run out of traditional options and their window closing, the couple explores the daunting world of medical, spiritual, and homeopathic methods to conceive a child. With an ensemble cast that also includes Bob Stephenson, Elizabeth Rodriguez, Ed Begley Jr., Jon Daly, and the late Glenne Headly, MAKING BABIES puts a couple through the ringer of modern infertility treatments and questions whether their marriage will withstand the ultimate test.

Couples struggling to get pregnant is an extremely personal and very common occurrence. It can tank marriages. It can lead to depression and hopelessness. But the realities of creating life can also be ridiculous and pretty damn funny. On the heels of Netflix’s Private Life, comes a new comedy Making Babies. Life doesn’t stop when you’re trying to conceive and it doesn’t get any easier once pregnant. This film does a great job of balancing the seriousness of stress, disappointment, commitment, and the excitement that comes with having kids. Everyone has an opinion on how you can get pregnant. Most couples don’t want to discuss it, but perhaps more people should. Making Babies delves into the hilarious and oftentimes heartbreaking honesty of everyone involved in the process, be it doctors, friends, other parents, and ourselves. The cast has fantastic, natural chemistry. Making Babies is a bright light on an otherwise dark topic.