Tribeca Film Festival 21 review: ‘POSER’

Lennon exists timidly on the sidelines of the thriving Columbus, Ohio indie music scene, yearning for a personal connection that might shepherd her into the inner sanctum of warehouse concerts, exclusive backstage, house parties and the cutting-edge art scene. As she fuels her desire for entrée into a podcast featuring live music and conversations with the artists she so fervently admires, Lennon finds inspiration for her own musical ambitions…and a growing sense of misdirected identity. Enter Bobbi Kitten, an enigmatic, striking and talented half of a popular, indie pop duo, who takes Lennon under her confident wing—unwittingly entangling herself in a dark obsession. 

**2021 Tribeca Film Festival: U.S. Narrative Competition**

Poser is a volatile and sensual unraveling. Lennon is attracted to the confidence of indie rock singers. In an attempt to jumpstart her new podcast, she follows acts through their underground performances, picking their brains and then some. When she meets Bobbi Kitten, the lead singer of Damn The Witch Siren, she is enamored. This close-knit community of creators allows Lennon to peek behind the curtain and gives her permission to step outside of her box, perhaps to their own detriment.

Directors Ori Segev and Noah Dixon have managed to create a film that possesses a timeless quality about self-actualization. I actually thought Dixon was a fellow Gen Xer based on a slew of very specific choices but as it turns out that’s not the case. This only proves the universality of Poser’s themes of self-doubt and the irrational decisions we make to fit in.

The chemistry between Bobbi Kitten and Sylvie Mix is magnetic. Kitten’s effortless awareness and cool girl demeanor draw the audience in immediately. She is a phenomenal foil for Mix’s portrayal of Lennon, whose guiding narration hits every beat. The vulnerability and ultimate indifference are consuming. This is the culmination of smart writing, superb casting, and kick-ass direction.

The editing and soundtrack are fly as hell. A mix of featured indie bands and a killer original score, it’s an entire character in the film. The third act should not have knocked me as hard as it did, the clues were all there. It’s a poetic injustice. That’s great writing. The wolf in sheep’s clothing metaphor is *chef’s kiss. Noah Dixon’s script is a chilling commentary on art and originality. Poser is a profoundly unique example of fighting your own perceived mediocrity. It’s creative as hell and a perfect fit for Tribeca audiences.

Tribeca Film Festival Screenings
 
World Premiere: Thursday, June 10th at 8 pm ET
Hudson Yards Public Square and Gardens
 

About Liz Whittemore

Liz grew up in northern Connecticut and was memorizing movie dialogue from Shirley Temple to A Nightmare on Elm Street at a very early age. She will watch just about any film all the way through (no matter how bad) just to prove a point. A loyal New Englander, a lover of Hollywood, and true inhabitant of The Big Apple.