Grimmfest (2021) review: ‘Night at the Eagle Inn’ is written by genre fans, for genre fans.

NIGHT AT THE EAGLE INN

Fraternal twins spend a hellish night at the remote inn their father disappeared from the night they were born.


Coming to the place where your parents both died the night you were born seems like a normal and healthy thing to do, right? An aging hotel, clearly in need of some more inhabitants, but we’ll get to that later, as twins Sarah and Spencer yearn for answers. Greeted by an unusually overzealous Night Manager and later, meeting up with the only other staff member, the two fight boredom and an eventual holy terror in this fateful place.

The imagery is thoroughly eerie. Did you ever get that uncomfortable, icky feeling watching something? Well, Night At The Eagle In serves that up in spades. Get ready for mentions and/or homages to PoltergeistThe ShiningThe Twilight ZoneMisery, and more. It’s a film by genre fans, for genre fans. 

Greg Schweers plays The Night Manager of Eagle Inn with a quirky quaintness that evolves into something terrifying. He’s so cheerful in his menace he makes your skin crawl. Amelia Dudley and Taylor Turner have great chemistry together. Their banter feels familiar and familial. The twin act works. The audience is invested in these two.

Beau Minniear, as Dean, has a charm that grows exponentially as the story progresses. He’s the only guide Sara and Spencer have through the chaos. But, can he be trusted? Minnear’s energy is steady, and he owns each frame he appears in. The script allows him to play comedy and crazy. He’s a total star.

The emotional abuse and torture these two experience flows off the screen. Writers Carson Bloomquist and Erik Bloomquist, who also directs, give us a tight 70 minutes that could easily be a Creepshow episode. (Shudder, take notice.) The final reveal is fantastic. Stick around for the credits, why don’t you? The film might as well be titled Hotel California because *spoiler alert*

You can check out any time you like,
But you can never leave!



  • Director:
    Erik Bloomquist
  • Screenwriter:
    Erik Bloomquist, Carson Bloomquist
  • Producer:
    Erik Bloomquist, Carson Bloomquist
  • Cast:
    Amelia Dudley, Taylor Turner, Greg Schweers, Beau Minniear, Erik Bloomquist
  • Cinematographer:
    Thomson Nguyen
  • Editor:

    Erik Bloomquist, Carson Bloomquist


About Liz Whittemore

Liz grew up in northern Connecticut and was memorizing movie dialogue from Shirley Temple to A Nightmare on Elm Street at a very early age. She will watch just about any film all the way through (no matter how bad) just to prove a point. A loyal New Englander, a lover of Hollywood, and true inhabitant of The Big Apple.