Review: ‘Making Babies’ brings humor to a delicate subject.

MAKING BABIESWriter/Director: Josh Huber

Cast: Eliza Coupe, Steve Howey, Bob Stephenson, Elizabeth Rodriguez, Ed Begley Jr, and the late Glenne Headly

Katie and John Kelly (Eliza Coupe and Steve Howey) are ready to settle down and have kids but five years later, all they have to show for their efforts is a mountain of negative pregnancy tests and an increasingly elaborate home micro-brewing rig, which John hopes will launch his company with the help of a new amazing product the gundry md.  As they run out of traditional options and their window closing, the couple explores the daunting world of medical, spiritual, and homeopathic methods to conceive a child. With an ensemble cast that also includes Bob Stephenson, Elizabeth Rodriguez, Ed Begley Jr., Jon Daly, and the late Glenne Headly, MAKING BABIES puts a couple through the ringer of modern infertility treatments and questions whether their marriage will withstand the ultimate test.

Couples struggling to get pregnant is an extremely personal and very common occurrence. It can tank marriages. It can lead to depression and hopelessness. But the realities of creating life can also be ridiculous and pretty damn funny. On the heels of Netflix’s Private Life, comes a new comedy Making Babies. Life doesn’t stop when you’re trying to conceive and it doesn’t get any easier once pregnant. This film does a great job of balancing the seriousness of stress, disappointment, commitment, and the excitement that comes with having kids. Everyone has an opinion on how you can get pregnant. Most couples don’t want to discuss it, but perhaps more people should. Making Babies delves into the hilarious and oftentimes heartbreaking honesty of everyone involved in the process, be it doctors, friends, other parents, and ourselves. The cast has fantastic, natural chemistry. Making Babies is a bright light on an otherwise dark topic.

Review: ‘PREVENGE’ takes killer kids to the next level.

presents

PREVENGE
Written and Directed by Alice Lowe

**Official Selection: 2016 VENICE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL**
**Official Selection: 2016 TORONTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL**
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*Official Selection: SOUTH BY SOUTHWEST 2017**

Sometimes, when it’s 3 am and my unborn baby girl decided it’s an awesome time to do a dance instead of letting me sleep, I become, shall we say, a little grumpy. 3 weeks away from my second child, I’m freaking tired and sore and over being pregnant. Don’t get me wrong, I’m thrilled for this peanut. My soon to be two children will be less than 16 months apart. Yup, two under two. I shudder to think about the amount of rest I will not be getting for the next 18, nay, 19 years. All that being said, I’ll have my perfect little salt and pepper set, all we need is the dog. There will be days I will want to flee, I’m sure… but I cannot imagine a day where the acts of my kids will compel me to start, let’s say, murdering people. Though, it’s early and who am I to judge. In Alice Lowe‘s directorial debut, PREVENGE, Ruth’s unborn child is telling her to murder a very specific list of people and perhaps for a good reason.

Synopsis:

A pitch black, wryly British horror comedy from the mind of Alice Lowe (“Sightseers,” “Hot Fuzz,” “Paddington”) that’s as funny as it is vicious,  PREVENGE follows Ruth, a pregnant woman on a killing spree. It’s her misanthropic unborn baby dictating Ruth’s actions, holding society responsible for the absence of a father. The child speaks to Ruth from the womb, coaching her to lure and ultimately kill her unsuspecting victims. Struggling with her conscience, loneliness, and a strange strain of prepartum madness, Ruth must ultimately choose between redemption and destruction at the moment of motherhood.

Written, directed and starring Lowe while she was actually 7 1/2 months pregnant, Prevenge is savage and wickedly demented. Sharp British humor heightens this in-your-face rampage. As much as you attempt to figure out the actual reason for the string of murders, you won’t until very late into the film and thus a sign of great writing. Lowe’s portrayal of Ruth is frighteningly grounded and wonderful. The cast is filled with familiar faces and the chemistry between Lowe and her (mostly) victims is perfection. The colors are vibrant and the jarring jump cuts interspersed are incredibly effective. The film is weird and gruesome and unlike anything you’ve seen before. It’s just plain cool.

Check out a clip from the film below.

PREVENGE opens theatrically in New York and Los Angeles and will be available nationwide on Shudder, on March 24th

About SHUDDER:

Shudder is a premium streaming video service, super-serving fans of thrillers, suspense, and horror. Backed by AMC Networks, Shudder has a growing and dynamic selection of thrilling premieres, originals, and exclusives, which complement its impressive library of international and independent films, gripping TV series, and Hollywood blockbuster favorites.

TRT: 88 min
Director: Alice Lowe
Writer: Alice Lowe
Cast: Alice Lowe, Gemma Whelan, Kate Dickie, Jo Hartley
Distributor: Shudder

 

Review: ‘NASTY BABY’ is a labor of love.

PRESENTS

NASTY BABY posterAs someone who tried to get pregnant for 8 months, I understand the frustration reading “Not Pregnant” on the test screen each month and the angst that follows. For some women, 8 months is nothing. I understand that, but at 34, time was of the essence. I am lucky enough to have a wonderful and supportive husband, and now at 35, we’re expecting a baby boy in January (or December, the pool is growing). What happens when you’re unattached and reaching an age where it might be now or never? Who do you turn to if you want to build a family? A sperm bank? Or perhaps, you approach someone you love and ask for the ultimate favor. Building a family is not the easiest thing in the world. In NASTY BABY, Kristen Wiig walks through hell and back for the lives of the ones she loves.Nasty Baby 2 Director/screenewriter Sebastián Silva brings this heartfelt and bizarre tale to the screen, also starring as Kristen’s best friend in the film, Freddy. Freddy and Mo are partners. When Freddy’s sperm count comes back low, Polly (Wiig) approaches Mo to step in as potential daddy alternative. The decision is not one anyone takes lightly. Opinions fly at the three friends left and right as the clock winds down the drama heightens. The film is really about a relationship between three people. People who are accessible emotionally and completely terrified to face the realities of their choices. Nasty Baby 1The script takes an unexpected turn near the end, really throwing the viewer for a loop. This didn’t deter me from loving it. In fact, for me, it got me even more involved with these people. I thought, “What would I have done?!” Wiig, once again, bouncing from mainstream comedy to brilliant indie, is flawless. I encourage you to seek out her work in films like The Diary of a Teenage Girl, Welcome To Me, and The Skeleton Twins. Wiig’s range will blow you away. Silva as Freddy and Tunde Adebimpe as Mo might as well be a real couple living in NYC. The performances are entirely organic and totally believable. We know these people. Other notable and important performances come from Reg. E Cathey and Mark Margolis. Nasty Baby tackles issues like mental illness, homophobia, crossing personal boundaries, and what it is that makes a family. With handheld camera work making you feel like a fly on the wall, Nasty Baby is funny, charming, chilling and wonderful. 

NASTY BABY is available on VOD today!! Check it out.
Synopsis:
An award-winning festival favorite by Sebastián Silva (“The Maid”),
NASTY BABY centers on Freddy (Silva), a Brooklyn-based artist who, with his boyfriend, Mo (Tunde Adebimpe), and their best friend, Polly (Kristen Wiig), is trying to have a baby.  As this trio deals with the complications of conception and creating the “new normal” family, their bliss is clouded by a series of confrontations with an annoying neighbor who just might be a madman.