Tribeca Film Festival 2019 Review: ‘Something Else’ is aptly named.

SOMETHING ELSE

The Midnight section at this year’s Tribeca Film Festival gives us Something Else. A story about Hank, whose longtime girlfriend Abby abruptly leaves him, but with a lot of extra flair in the plot. The editing is spectacular. Crisp still camera images set against a bleakly lit Hank, make for a perfect early jump scare. Then you catch on that’s it’s a repeated theme. Abby equals brightness. No Abby equals darkness… and a monster at the front door. The music has a heavily Gen X quality. The daytime dialogue (once Abby is absent) feels reminiscent of early Kevin Smith, particularly from everyone around Hank. This gives teeth to the naturalistic performances from a small cast. Classic tropes weave into the darker scenes and then the film becomes something altogether different. Something Else is exactly that. It’s like two films in one. It’s a monster movie and a serious relationship drama which incidentally includes a 15-minute single camera take of dialogue. Something Else is aptly named and unexpected on all fronts.

SOMETHING ELSE

For small-town bar owner Hank (Jeremy Gardner), his 10-year relationship with Abby (Brea Grant) has been storybook-quality. Abby, however, wants more: marriage, to be exact, which Hank doesn’t seem ready to initiate anytime soon. As a result, she leaves him without so much as a note or any subsequent communication. Hank is crushed. Even worse, Abby’s departure seemingly triggers the arrival of an unseen monster that claws at Hank’s front door at night. As the nocturnal threat intensifies, Hank must figure out how to not only save his relationship but also himself.

Tribeca Film Festival 2019 Review: ‘Come To Daddy’ is everything you’d want an Ant Timpson film to be.

COME TO DADDY

Elijah Wood plays an emotionally overwhelmed uber hipster attempting to reconnect with his estranged father. Summoned to a secluded home via a mysterious letter from his dad, he finds himself in an unexpected situation. Wood, as always, is vulnerable and funny. I’ll buy anything he’s selling. His body of work is so eclectic and wonderfully bizarre, what’s not to love? Now let’s talk about Ant Timpson‘s amazing directing. As a producer, The ABC’s Of Death is off the wall fun and don’t even get me started on the insanity that is The Greasy Strangler. Come To Daddy, Timpson’s directorial debut is a genre-bending funhouse. Tribeca’s Midnight section is the perfect slot for Timpson’s work and I do mean that as a compliment. This film takes a sharp turn at 30 minutes in, then hurtles from mysterious to funny, unsettling to WTF, and it is a delight. The camera work is top-notch. There is mayhem for days. Wonderfully timed plot treats fall into our laps like a busted piñata. I simply cannot express how damn fun this film is. You will not have any clue where this is going.

Norval’s (Elijah Wood) life has been, to put it lightly, difficult. Currently living home with his mother, the troubled young man is coming off alcohol-related struggles. So when he receives an unexpected letter from his estranged father requesting a visit, Norval catches a bus up to his dad’s secluded and scenic waterfront home. Maybe reconnecting with his father will give Norval the emotional fulfillment he’s been lacking. Before long, though, he notices something off about his dad, an uneasy feeling triggered by inappropriate comments and a possible over-dependence on booze. Norval quickly realizes that his hope of father/son bonding is doomed. Instead of a family reunion, he finds himself in waking nightmare.
FILM INFO

Tribeca Film Festival Review: ‘TIGER RAID’ is a spectacular test of loyalty.

Tribeca Film Festival logo 2016

World Premiere in the Midnight Category
Section at the 2016 Tribeca Film Festival

tider raid brain and glesson and moloney

Starring:
 Brian Gleeson (Snow White and the Huntsman, The Eagle),
Damien Molony (Suspects),
Sofia Boutella (Kingsman: The Secret Service, upcoming Star Trek Beyond)  and
Rory Fleck-Byrne (The Quiet Ones)

Directed by: Simon Dixon

Written by: Simon Dixon, Mick Donnellan

While on a covert mission, two cold blooded mercenaries form an unlikely bond as they race across the desert in the dead of night. When their violent and desperate world implodes, past atrocities come to the surface threatening to tear each of them apart.

Tiger_Raid_brian gleeson

With Tarantino-esque dialogue driven scenes, TIGER RAID opens in the arid Iraq dessert, as Joe and Paddy approach their mission location. They are assigned with the kidnapping of an unknown individual, receiving orders from earpieces whose instructions are just muffled enough to be a mystery to the audience. Along the way, we learn piecemeal that each man has a haunted past. About 10 minutes in, we get our first plot twist. These flips in writer/director Simon Dixon’s script keep coming as the film’s 92 minutes roll along. I think I lost count at 4. Brian Gleeson as Joe is fierce and domineering, yet somehow totally lovable as he revels in his joy for the kill. Damien Molony shines as Paddy, a man whose emotional obsession comes between his sense of right and wrong. The story is about the extremes of loyalty and the justification of past indiscretions. For me, there is not one moment that is out of place in this film. The score has both a menacing and ethereal feel. The close-ups are delicious and meaningful. The sound design is impeccable and poignant. TIGER RAID takes you on a journey into the minds of men who kill for money and for sport. This vibrant and unapologetically violent ride is beyond engrossing from every angle. It will not disappoint.

  • Section: Midnight
  • Year: 2016
  • Length: 92 minutes
  • Language: English
  • Country: U.K.
  • Premiere: World
You can still get rush tickets for tonight’s screening. I highly recommend that you do.
9:45 PM – FRI 4/22 BOW TIE CINEMAS CHELSEA 5Icon-fg-map RUSH