57th New York Film Festival begins with the world premiere of Scorsese’s ‘The Irishman’ arriving soon on Netflix & select theaters

If you aren’t catching one of the few screenings of The Irishman at the New York Film Festival, it will come to Netflix on November 1st and will go do select theaters (major cities) on November 27th.

I’m so excited to see a Netflix movie premiere as the opening night film. What makes a movie? It’s not definable. You know when you see it. This is a movie.

Robert De Niro, Al Pacino and Joe Pesci star in Martin Scorsese’s THE IRISHMAN, an epic saga of organized crime in post-war America told through the eyes of World War II veteran Frank Sheeran, a hustler and hitman who worked alongside some of the most notorious figures of the 20th century. Spanning decades, the film chronicles one of the greatest unsolved mysteries in American history, the disappearance of legendary union boss Jimmy Hoffa, and offers a monumental journey through the hidden corridors of organized crime: its inner workings, rivalries and connections to mainstream politics.

 

Review: ‘Silence’- The Journey of Faith is a Rough One

Martin Scorsese returns to cinemas with Silence, a passion project that’s been in development for over 25 years. This epic historical drama is based on the 1966 novel of the same name by Shūsaku Endō follows two 17th century Jesuit priests who travel from Portugal to Japan in order to locate their missing mentor and spread the word of God. A film about those who have questioned their faith from time to time and those who would sacrifice their lives in the name of it. A powerful movie that is anything but silent.

Father Cristóvão Ferreira (Liam Neeson) has been spreading the word of God under threats of his life in Japan when his communication runs silent. His two pupils Father Sebastião Rodrigues (Andrew Garfield) and Father Francisco Garupe (Adam Driver) set out to Japan to dispel the notion that Father Ferreira committed apostasy and learn of his fate. On their travels they meet Kichijiro (Yosuke Kubozuka), an alcoholic fisherman who has fled Japan and now begs to return. Kichijiro agrees to become their guide and help them find sanctuary in the hostile land while they learn of the location of their mentor. The priests arrive to Japan to learn that the local Christian population has been driven into hiding for fear of their lives.

Seeing that their influence is needed, Fathers Rodrigues and Garupe begin helping the natives reclaim their faith in the Lord until the inquisitor arrives at the village and demands information about any suspected Christians. Seeing first hand the brutality that the countrymen face for their faith, The two priests split up in hopes to find Father Ferreira, but they face the harsh conditions of living in secret which leads Rodrigues into imprisonment. While under the guard of the Samurai, he is expected to denounce his faith and set an example for those imprisoned for believing in Christianity that they must also denounce God. Rodrigues begins to question the motives of God for the suffering of the Japanese people. Soon, it is his own faith that will be tested and his will to do what’s right over what he believes the Lord would want.

Silence is a tale of choice, of sacrifice and of self preservation. It’s a film deeply woven into the history of Catholicism that highlights the trials and tribulations that these priests and their followers endured. Martin Scorsese’s brilliant storytelling delicately parallels the suffering of the Jesuit priests and those of the apostles of Christs time and delves into the psyche of the faithful and those questioning theirs. Andrew Garfield is brilliant as Fathers Rodrigues and brings an intense, emotional performance to the film that truly encapsulates the emotional journey the young priest endures. Adam Driver is a wonderful supporting performance and creates a moral reference point for which all other characters in the film can be judged. Yosuke Kubozuka’s character is a brilliant representation of humanity and it’s struggle with faith. Kubozuka is chilling and delivers a truly thought provoking performance. Liam Neeson‘s presence is otherworldly and commands the screen when he’s present. The actor says more in his expression and delivers some astonishingly personal dialogue that capture the true essence of the situation they are all facing.

Overall, Silence is a treasure. It’s a film that will leave you deep in thought and questioning the strength of your own faith. Scorsese does it again.

Stars:

4 out of 5

After Credit Scene?

No

Trailer:

The first trailer for Martin Scorsese’s ‘SILENCE’ is here

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The first trailer for Martin Scorsese’s SILENCE is here and we have it for you below!

The film tells the story of two Christian missionaries (Andrew Garfield and Adam Driver) who face the ultimate test of faith when they travel to Japan in search of their missing mentor (Liam Neeson) – at a time when Christianity was outlawed and their presence forbidden. The celebrated director’s 28-year journey to bring Shusaku Endo’s 1966 acclaimed novel to life.

SILENCE is in select theaters December 23rd and expanding wide January 6th

Poster for Martin Scorsese’s ‘SILENCE’ arrives

silenceonlinepayoff1-sheet

Martin Scorsese’s SILENCE tells the story of two Christian missionaries (Andrew Garfield and Adam Driver) who face the ultimate test of faith when they travel to Japan in search of their missing mentor (Liam Neeson) – at a time when Christianity was outlawed and their presence forbidden. The celebrated director’s 28-year journey to bring Shusaku Endo’s 1966 acclaimed novel to life will be in theaters this Christmas.

See the trailer tomorrow in theaters on Allied and everywhere Saturday!

SILENCE is in theaters December 23rd

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/silencemovie

#SilenceMovie

Review/Interview: OITNB star Nick Sandow talks ‘THE WANNABE’

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Presents

THE WANNABE

Respect isn’t earned. It’s stolen.

Written & Directed & Co-Starring Nick Sandow (Captuto on Orange is the New Black) Executive Produced by Academy Award Winner Martin Scorsese (Goodfellas) & Dean Devlin (Independence Day)

The wannanbe poster
No matter who we are, during our lives we have idolized a person. Perhaps in some cases, to a point that may border on the unhealthy. Orange Is The New Black star, Nick Sandow, has written and directed a new film where that idol is the infamous mobster John Gotti. Meet one man’s story of obsession and desperation to be somebody, in The Wannabe.
The wannabe still Patricia Arquette,Vincent Piazza

Based on true events and Executive Produced by Martin Scorsese and Dean Devlin, comes  a story about Thomas ( Vincent Piazza), a man obsessed with Mafia culture during the 1990s in New York City. When Thomas’s failed attempts to fix the trial of infamous mobster John Gotti gets him rejected by the people he idolizes most, he sets off on a drug infused crime spree with his girlfriend and long time mob groupie, Rose (Patricia Arquette), by brazenly robbing the local Mafia hangouts.

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The film is perfectly paced by Sandow‘s writing. Coming up with the story after a friend sent him an article about the real life couple, The Wannabe is a “what might have happened” tale. Perfectly cast as Thomas, Vincent Piazza gives a fully fleshed out performance as a man who craves acceptance. When he doesn’t receive it, drugs lead to power hungry and dangerous life choices. Piazza’s time on Boardwalk Empire served him well in outlining his gangster look and the way he carried himself physically. We’re on the emotional roller coaster alongside him throughout. Patricia Arquette as Rose, is nothing less than brilliant. I am convinced that no matter what character you throw at her, she would own it. Her ease and presence on screen is unmatched, ever the scene stealer. Also, a Boardwalk alum, along with Sandow, it is clear that their chemistry as a trio makes the film as successful as it is.wannabe- Patrcia Arquette

I was privileged to interview Nick Sandow this week. Take a look at what he had to say about The Wannabe.


Liz: Firstly, Nick, thanks for taking the time to chat with me. The Wannabe is an incredibly successful story of audacious choices and personal delusion. Love the structure and style. So, congratulations on the film!

 Where is the line between truth and fiction with Thomas and Rose’s story?
Nick: The line is blurry. There were a handful of facts about a real couple that in the early nineties went around robbing mob social clubs. I was fascinated with how they got from A to Z. I just ran with the story and started to blend in real events that were going on at that time.
Liz: You write and direct this project. What was the biggest challenge in wearing both hats?
Nick: Writing and directing hats go very well together. I’ve directed things that I didn’t write and I have to work very hard to find my way into it. When you write it….. it’s yours…. you are already inside it. It has your DNA all over it so when it comes time to direct it I am attempting to take it further and trying to find another level of understanding with all the tools available.
Liz: Getting the script to Scorsese, wow. What was that moment like when he decided to come on board?
Nick: I couldn’t believe it. I still don’t. It’s hard to fathom. But what a gentle guiding spirit he is.
Liz: When writing, did you already have Vincent and Patricia in mind?
Nick:  I didn’t have them in mind at first but when they did come on board they were both very influential contributors to the rewriting process.
Liz: Was mob history an interest of yours prior to discovering this story?
Nick: Mob history wasn’t an interest. I grew up in a very similar neighborhood in the Bronx. So it was less an interest than a way of life.
Liz: How easy/difficult was it to shoot in the city for it being a period piece?
Nick: It was extremely difficult shooting a period piece in NYC on our budget in 20 days. It was all about finding the right locations. We had 35 location in 20 days. We were trying to find the 90s in the city and you really have to hunt for it. It’s there, you just have to get out into the boroughs. We shot in every one of them except Staten Island.
Liz: Have you ever been obsessed, for lack of a better word, with an individual in the way Thomas was?
Nick:  I’m not sure I was ever as obsessed as Thomas with one single person but I do very much identify with the desperation of wanting to be someone you are not. I’ve made a living out of doing that as an actor for 25 years. I understand where that obsession comes from… I had an outlet for it with acting.
Liz: You, as an actor, have a knack to for being cast as an authority figure, shall we say? Why do you think that is?
Nick: I’ve never really thought of this before. An authority figure….hmmmm. To be honest the first thing that pops into my head is that as a kid I always felt I needed to know the answers to survive. In many ways that served me and in many ways as a young person I feel it shut me down to learning as much as I could of. Maybe this is why? It’s only a guess. I really don’t know.
Liz: We are definitely excited for more Caputo action in Season 4 this June. We’re really rooting for something good to happen to this character! Outside of OITNB, what’s next for you?
Nick: Yes, there will be more Caputo in Season 4. It’s going to be a great season. I’m also excited about it.
Besides Orange, I am looking to shoot another film this spring. It’s a great script written by Frank Pugliese of House of Cards. It is the weekend in the life of a middle aged retired pro football player coming to grips with having Dimentia. I’m also working on a documentary about Kalief Browder who was wrongfully imprisoned for 3 years on Rikers Island from the age of 16 to 19.
Liz: That all sounds incredibly exciting! Thanks again for your time, Nick. ReelNewsDaily is looking forward to seeing more of you any way we can!

Starring:

Academy Award Winner Patricia Arquette (Boyhood),  Vincent Piazza (Boardwalk Empire), Michael Imperioli (The Sopranos),Domenick Lombardozzi (The Wire), David Zayas (Dexter) & Nick Sandow (Orange Is The New Black)

The Wannabe is now playing in select theaters nationwide and is available on all VOD platforms.

‘The Devil in the White City’ Coming with Scorsese and DiCaprio

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The big screen adaptation of Erik Larson’s best-selling true crime tale The Devil in the White City is on its way! Deadline is reporting that Paramount Pictures has picked up the rights to the novel with the plan being for a big screen adaptation with Leonardo DiCaprio and director Martin Scorsese. This would be the sixth movie that DiCaprio and Scorsese have made together. Academy Award nominee Billy Ray (Captain Phillips) will adapted the screenplay.

Published in 2003, The Devil in the White City is officially described by Crown Publishing as follows:

Their fates were linked by the magical Chicago World’s Fair of 1893, nicknamed the “White City” for its majestic beauty. Architect Daniel Burnham built it; serial killer Dr. H. H. Holmes used it to lure victims to his World’s Fair Hotel, designed for murder. Both men left behind them a powerful legacy, one of brilliance and energy, the other of sorrow and darkness.

Here, then, is your ticket to the greatest fair in history—a place where incredible dreams came to life alongside darkest nightmares.

DiCaprio will play the part of the serial killer Mr. Holmes.

No word on release date as of yet but stay tuned for more updates.

Jeremy’s Interview: Lance Edmands, Award-Winning ‘Bluebird’ Writer/Director

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If you followed my coverage of the Indy Film Fest, you might remember I was able to catch (review here) the Grand Jury & American Spectrum Prize-Winning Bluebird, written and directed by Lance Edmands. You also might remember that it was my favorite of the films that I saw at the festival. I was curious to learn more about the film, its evolution and its journey to the screen so I reached out to Lance and he was kind of enough to give me 45 minutes of his time. Here’s what he had to say… Read More →

Jeremy’s Review: Livi Zheng’s ‘Brush with Danger’ Misses the Mark

Brush With Danger posterSometimes when you see a film, from the outset you know it’s one you want to see – maybe because you like the lead actor, it’s the passion project of a director you respect or it has a message that is missing in other films. Livi Zheng‘s Brush with Danger is one of these films. Her first feature as a director that was written by her brother and co-star Ken Zheng, Brush with Danger tackles a hot-button topic in illegal immigration to the US from Asia. There are a million ways to approach a subject like thisgoing the character study route a la Cary Fukunaga‘s gorgeous Sin Nombre or showing the dark side of the immigrant experience like Stephen FrearsDirty Pretty Things or even the battle-infused experience of Scorsese‘s The Gangs of New York, all of which were incredibly successful in telling their tales and engaging their audiences. It is unfortunate that Brush with Danger falls flat almost from the opening shot and doesn’t live up to the promise of an interesting premise. Read More →

Watch Now On HBO: NYFF52 Doc ‘The 50 Year Argument’ From Directors Martin Scorsese & David Tedeschi

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The 50 Year Argument

Airing on HBO beginning September 29, 2014 Read More →

Jeremy’s Interview: Lance Edmands, Award-Winning “Bluebird” Writer/Director

SFF_BLUEBIRD_Lance_Edmands_press

If you followed my coverage of the Indy Film Fest, you might remember I was able to catch (review here) the Grand Jury & American Spectrum Prize-Winning Bluebird, written and directed by Lance Edmands. You also might remember that it was my favorite of the films that I saw at the festival. I was curious to learn more about the film, its evolution and its journey to the screen so I reached out to Lance and he was kind of enough to give me 45 minutes of his time. Here’s what he had to say… Read More →

Liz’s ‘Life Itself’ Review: Two Thumbs Way Up

Life Itself

As someone who has been on a whirlwind adventure in writing exclusively about film for the past year, it was sincerely my pleasure and honor to see Life Itself this afternoon. Director Steve James brings a touching documentary to the audiences who grew up watching Robert Ebert tell them which movies were worth spending their time and hard earned money on. We are privy to passages directly from Ebert’s memoir of the same name, intimate interviews both on camera and via private emails between Steve and Roger, as well as sit down, one on ones with some of the people closest to this critical giant, including his wife, Chaz, director, Martin Scorsese, and Marlene Iglitzen, wife of his industry other half, Gene Siskel. Read More →