Review: ‘The Dark End Of The Street’ will capture your attention.

Set in an idyllic, suburban community where someone is killing other residents’ pets, The Dark End of the Street focuses on several characters over the course of one long night: a lonely woman mourning her dog, the culprit committing the violent acts, an overly concerned family man, and restless teenagers. And over this night, their worlds will intertwine in ways none of them ever could have expected.

Even though made on a micro-budget, talent looms large in The Dark End of the Street. In a cool 70 minutes, this film tackles paranoia, generational differences, hard life choices, typical suburban teen life, family dynamics, all against the backdrop of an unknown neighborhood sociopath. The screenplay feels reminiscent of other great vignette films like Playing By Heart and GO. Performances, a few from faces you will recognize from various projects big and small, are all wonderful. There is a beautiful level of intimacy woven into the scenes. You are instantly drawn into the lives of each character. These are conversations, or some form of them, that we’ve experienced. They discuss safety, the longing for recaptured youth, boredom, impending parenthood, and the death of a life once lived.  Despite the implicated (never actually shown) violence, The Dark End Of The Street is universally relatable. Coupled with interesting cinematography that shows an eye for detail, Kevin Tran’s little indie drama is incredibly impactful.

Gravitas Venture is releasing The Dark End of the Street nationwide on VOD today, August 11th.

The Dark End of the Street stars Scott Friend, Lindsay Burdge, Brooke Bloom, Jim Parrack, Michael Cyril Creighton, Jennifer Kim, Daniel K. Isaac, Anthony Chisholm, and Rod Luzzi.
It is written and directed by Kevin TRAN.
Color
English Language
70 minutes
Not Rated

Review: ‘Thirst Street’… Just Look Up “Thirsty” On Urban Dictionary

Thirst Street

Theatrical Release (NYC): September 20, 2017

Theatrical Release (LA): September 29, 2017

Guest review from Reel Reviews Over Brews

Alone and depressed after the suicide of her lover, American flight attendant Gina (Lindsay Burdge) travels to Paris and hooks up with nightclub bartender Jerome (Damien Bonnard) on her layover. But as Gina falls deeper into lust and opts to stay in France, this harmless rendezvous quickly turns into unrequited amour fou. When Jerome’s ex Clemence (Esther Garrel) reenters the picture, Gina is sent on a downward spiral of miscommunication, masochism, and madness. Inspired by European erotic dramas from the ’70s, Thirst Street burrows deep into the delirious extremes we go to for love.

Thirsty
1. Too eager to get something (especially play)
2. Desperate
That is the Urban Dictionary definition for “thirsty.” Boy it is spot on for this film. Thirst Street is one trippy ride down the rabbit hole of obsession. The film is set in Paris, but not the romanticized verizon commonly seen in movies, but it’s darker edge. The director did a great job finding that darker tone with the characters and night clubs throughout the film. The plot is right out of a guy’s nightmare. Gina (Lindsay Burdge) hooks-up with Jerome (Damien Bonnard), a random guy from a club, and slowly becomes “a stage five clinger.” Yikes! She goes to extremes trying to keep Jerome for herself. Lindsay Burdge is actually the best part of this movie! She killed it. She certainly made us feel that she is this obsessive, crazy one night hookup you are desperately trying to get rid of. Thirst Street is labeled a drama, but for some guys, it could be viewed as a horror. Would we recommend going to theaters to see it? No. Save your money. It could be a Netflix hidden gem to watch one day, hopefully not with a date though… we don’t want them getting any ideas.

Reel ROB Rating: 2.5 out of 5 stars

Post Credits Scene: No

We want to thank our friends at Reel News Daily for allowing us to do this guest review for them!