Review: ‘SMALLER AND SMALLER CIRCLES’

Two Jesuit priests perform forensic work to solve the mystery revolving around the murders of young boys in one of Metro Manila’s biggest slum areas. While dealing with the systematic corruption of the government, church and the elite, the two priests delve into criminal profiling, crime scene investigation and forensic analysis to solve the killings, and eventually, find the murderer.

Based on the award-winning novel by Filipino author F.H. Batacan, SMALLER AND SMALLER CIRCLES illustrates the best and worst of human nature: the antiseptic and dirty, the sublime and rotten, the hellish and divine.

With an unusual premise of having priests specialize in forensics, Smaller and Smaller Circles opens with haunting music and a disturbing image. Setting the stage for a mystery no one wants to delve further into. It addresses corruption in every corner of the church. Driven by greed and in the interest of reputation over the safety of the community’s young boys, we are witness to evil in many forms. A moody tone is set, eerily similar to the feeling Season 1 of True Detective gave us. The film could have easily been a mini-series. The final scene leads me to believe that this story isn’t over, in a sense. At the very least, our leading  characters have more work they can do. I, for one, would be invested in another film if not a redeveloped series, altogether. There are more details, I can only assume, the novel addresses. The story feels incomplete, only in the sense that I wanted more. Ultimately, this is a compliment to the intricacy of the storyline. The forensics aspects are intensely graphic but profoundly effective. The acting from ancillary characters is a bit spotty. It feels as if locals without experience were used to fill those roles. Though, I must give credit to each lead. Fully fleshed out backstories were felt even if we didn’t see them. This is yet another reason I would watch an expanded version. Smaller and Smaller Circles is undeniably engrossing.

SMALLER AND SMALLER CIRCLES was directed by Raya Martin and written by Raymond Lee and Ria Limjap.  The film features both English and Filipino language.  It has a running time of 111 minutes and will not be rated by the MPAA.

Uncork’d Entertainment will release the film in Los Angeles and additional select markets on March 1.  It will then be released digitally on March 19 (iTunes, Amazon, Vudu, Google Play, Fandango Now, Xbox and local Cable).

Review: ‘DRIFTWOOD’ is anything but hollow.

You might think that a film without a single word of dialogue would be difficult or tedious to watch. You’d be completely wrong in the case of festival favorite, Driftwood. After a young woman washes up on shore, an older man “rescues” her and brings her to his home to recoup. But all is not what it seems from the very beginning. The relationship between the two is unsettling at every turn. Is the woman an amnesiac? Performances from all three cast members are equally intriguing. Each wanting for something completely different. Again… all without dialogue! The viewer’s insinuations make this story a unique emotional journey. Writer/director Paul Taylor has done something so new and strange, easily running the gambit of humorous to patriarchal grotesque, Driftwood will leave you scratching your head and wanting to watch again and again. The impact is undoubtedly endless.Check out the film’s chilling trailer below…
DRIFTWOOD is now available on ITUNES

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Paul Taylor’s DRIFTWOOD was the 2016 Slamdance Jury Prize winner for Best Narrative Film

Review: ‘GIRL FLU’ is contagious fun.

Growing up is awkward. No one is ever really prepared to deal with puberty, whether it’s the child or the parent. In Dorie Barton‘s brilliant directorial debut, Girl Flu, one little girl isn’t the only one that comes face to face with what it means to become a woman.

Synopsis:

Bird, 12, has to become a woman whether she wants to or not when – in the worst week of her life – she gets her first period, is ditched by her impulsive, free spirited mom, and learns that you can never really go back to The Valley.

 

Girl Flu is truly an endearing film. Funny, relatable, and just enough edge to surpass the afterschool special pigeonhole, it’s a directorial debut that Dorie Barton can be proud of. Whether the reality of the plot is who is really raising whom, we are treated to some incredibly sold performances from the entire cast. Katee Sackhoff (Battlestar Galactica) brings Jenny to life; an ill-equipped, young mother, raising a 12-year-old, who never quite grew up herself. Her crunchy and pot smoking morning rituals annoy the hell out of her daughter and her boyfriend, played by Jeremy Sisto (Waitress). Sackhoff is a beautiful balance of super flighty and genuinely sincere. Sisto, solid as ever, navigates his evolving feelings for mother and daughter alike adding to the heart and humor of a universal milestone. Heather Matarazzo (Welcome to the Dollhouse), as mom Jenny’s best friend, is damn hilarious. Not surprising for Matarazzo, as she lights up the screen in every role she plays. The real breakout star, without a doubt, is our major lead Jade Pettyjohn (School of Rock) as Bird. Humiliated and bullied, surviving on the resiliency she’s been forced to develop, she is whip-smart, vulnerable, and a total pro in this role. Irrational child logic is what makes this script so honestly entertaining. We laugh because we’ve been there. The cool soundtrack is the perfect addition. It’s been a fan favorite at over two dozen film festivals so far and it’s easy to see why. You can catch GIRL FLU on VOD (Amazon, iTunes, Google Play) today, September 29. Check out the trailer below!

 

Review: ‘Agent’… Derek Ting Does It All, In This Action Packed Sci-Fi Flick!

Agent

Now Available on Vimeo, iTunes, Google Play, Vudu, Xbox, & Playstation

Available on Hulu & Amazon Prime: July 1, 2017

Guest review from Reel Reviews Over Brews

Agent starts out by looking into the life of Jim Yung (Derek Ting). We find that he is trying to adapt to a normal life after returning from service. Jim’s friends, Angela (Marikah Cunningham) and Seth (Eric Keitel) decide they are going to visit Jim and try getting him out of his funk. They bring along Kara (Olivia Hultgren) in hopes to spark a fling. When Seth and Angela arrive, they decide that they are going out into the desert to shoot some high powered guns. The group meets up with a former secret service agent, John (Terrance Christopher Jones), who is their shooting instructor. Upon their day of shooting, the group of friends accidentally awakens something so powerful that they must choose between saving each other or saving the world.

So, we came across the movie Agent in a sort of funny way. We noticed that the movie’s Instagram page (@agentthemovie) was following us. We reached out in hopes to learn more and upon getting to know actor/director/writer, Derek Ting, he sent us a screening. Long story short, here we are!

Now to the review… Agent grabs your attention right away with the characters. They are very real. Jim Yung (Derek Ting) and Angela Porter (Marikah Cunningham) steal the show. It’s hard not to get caught up in their stories. The camera angles were great, although a few minor corrections could have been made, we liked what they did. The setting was a nice fit too. What better spot to feel trapped and deserted than a desert where no one can hear you scream!? Action is what usually holds our attention the best and this film certainly wasn’t lacking. Probably one our our favorite parts about this movie was that it didn’t follow the typical “shoot them in the head to stop them” plot. They had a pretty ingenious spin on that. We can absolutely see Agent being a perfect movie to play on the Syfy channel, but until then, go check it out on any of the viewing platforms we listed above.

PS, in a few days we’ll be following up this review with a Q&A from actor/director/writer, Derek Ting. So keep an eye out!

Reel ROB Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars

Post Credits Scene: Yes

We want to thank our friends at Reel News Daily for allowing us to do this guest review for them!

Review: ‘Even Lambs Have Teeth’ Has A Pretty Good Bite

Even Lambs Have Teeth

Available Now: iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, Vudu, & VOD

Guest review from Reel Reviews Over Brews

Two best friends, Sloane (Kirsten Prout) and Katie (Tiera Skovbye), are trying to raise some extra cash for their shopping spree in New York by working at an eco-farm. While waiting for a bus to take them to the eco-farm, two brothers, Jed (Garrett Black) and Lucas (Jameson Parker) befriend the girls. The brothers offer to take Sloane and Katie to the farm, however, the girls instead are taken to the brother’s home where they are drugged. When they wake up they find themselves chained up in shipping containers and soon find out they are going to be used as sex slaves. Katie’s FBI uncle, Jason (Michael Karl Richards), gets a bad vibe about how the girls are making out and goes on the hunt to find them. Eventually the girls escape, but instead of running, they return to the crime scene to seek revenge… that’s when things get ugly!

First, we loved the title to this movie!! The first half of the movie felt like a straight forward horror flick. We quickly find that Sloane is more willing to toe the line of reckless, while Katie is more reserved and hesitant… at first. As the movie progressed it becomes apparent these girls would get their revenge and we became eager to see how they would pull it off. Sloane and Katie had our attention from the beginning and never lost it. We found it hard not to love them, especially when they started on their rampage, we couldn’t look away. Once the second half of the movie got going, we felt it became less of a horror movie and more of a thriller. The revenge scenes felt more fun than scary, as the girls got pretty creative with their torture techniques. Although the dialogue did get a bit stale at times and some of the plot was predictable, in the end this horror movie DOES have a pretty good bite! We highly enjoyed it.

Reel ROB Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

Post Credits Scene: No

We want to thank our friends at Reel News Daily for allowing us to do this guest review for them!

Review: ‘The Devil’s Candy’ offers up sweet scares and hard rock.

Presents
THE DEVIL’S CANDY

Sean Byrne, USA, 2015, DCP, 90m
Six long years may have elapsed since Aussie writer-director Sean Byrne made The Loved Ones—the closing-night film of Scary Movies 4, and perhaps the most satisfying horror film of the last decade—but it will come to no genre fan’s surprise that his follow-up was more than worth the wait. As exquisitely crafted as his debut feature, The Devil’s Candy stars a captivatingly intense and nearly unrecognizable Ethan Embry as an artist struggling to support his devoted wife (Shiri Appleby) and preteen daughter (Kiara Glasco). But the real fight for survival begins when the tight-knit family moves into a new house, unaware that its previous occupant is a royally disturbed child-killer (Pruitt Taylor Vince) who wants his home back. And even worse, the devil’s demands that swirl around in the sick man’s head—muted only by heavy-metal music—also begin taking hold of the artist and his paintings. After witnessing this intensely emotional and haunting work, audiences too will struggle to shake those demonic voices.

I had to look twice, nay, three times to make sure I wasn’t seeing things. Ethan Embry is a ripped, rock god in this surprising feature. I cannot express how much adored this film. With a slight Amityville feel, the latin voices heard in this film will get under your skin immediately. Loaded with seriously sick tunes from bands like Metalica and Queens of the Stoneage, the music takes on a life of its own in The Devil’s Candy. The film has an 80’s throwback feel in approaching the death metal and satanic ritual link. Visually, one of the coolest flicks I’ve seen in a while, especially for a horror. High-end effects are beautifully juxtaposed with unique paintings as each is being assembled… or disassembled as it were. The entire cast is spot on awesome. The Devil’s Candy has gorgeous framing and jump scares galore. I HIGHLY recommend you catch this particular selection if horror is truly your genre of choice. It will make your head spin and your skin crawl. It’s one of the best of 2017.

See THE DEVIL’S CANDY on VOD (iTunes; Amazon Video) or cable On Demand (XFINITY; Spectrum; Optimum or you local provider)

Review: ‘When The Bough Breaks’ takes an emotionally impactful look at PPD.

Presents

I remember the disappointment when after 16 hrs of laboring, I wasn’t progressing with my son. C-section it would have to be. Okay. As long as he’s healthy, that’s all that matters. After what seemed to be a routine surgery, as soon as my husband was about to bring our son around to show me his little face, my body had a reaction to the Pitocin and anesthesia combination and I began getting sick while trapped down and numb. So much so that I was unable to turn to see my newborn son’s face for the first 24 hrs. Getting up after essentially becoming the lady sawed in half is harder than you think, despite the copious amounts of drugs being pumped into your IV. When I did finally shuffle slowly towards the NICU and saw him, so small and helpless and covered in monitors, there was an unfathomable feeling. Nothing. I felt a total disconnect and has no idea why. It took me months to come to terms with having a traumatic birth. Through breastfeeding challenges, a baby that would not sleep (thus Mom and Dad that didn’t sleep either) I was losing it. While I did get into the swing of things, I had other very close friends who were telling me that they were experiencing Post Partum Depression. “Baby Blues” are what I was going through. I wasn’t crying every day or having horrible thoughts. I was getting better. PPD is not something we talk about because of its stigma. That is not ok. 

When The Bough Breaks is a feature length documentary about postpartum depression and postpartum psychosis.  Narrated and Executive Produced by Brooke Shields, this shocking film uncovers this very public health issue which affects one in five new mothers after childbirth.
The film follows Lindsay Gerszt, a mother who has been suffering from PPD for six years. Lindsay agrees to let the cameras document her and give us an in-depth look at her path to recovery. We meet women who have committed infanticide and families who have lost loved ones to suicide.
Babies are dying, women aren’t speaking out and the signs are being missed.  When The Bough Breaks takes us on a journey to find answers and break the silence.  This film also features stories from singer Carnie Wilson, actress Tanya Newbould, celebrity chef Aarti Sequeira and Peggy Tanous of The Real Housewives of Orange County.

Lindsay Gerszt‘s story is not as uncommon as one might think. PPD is not something we talk about enough. This doc does an exceptional job of mixing intimate sit down interviews and actual science behind this mental illness. There are some interviews with mothers who never got the help they needed. As a mom, it is very difficult to hear and to watch. To be honest, I had to step away for a moment because I started to cry. But, it’s important not to ignore. This is truly valuable information. Treatments, from every kind, are discussed. Groups and reach out programs highlighted. It’s a treasure trove of knowledge in about 1 hour and 30 minutes. The film’s impact will stay with me always and I will now become an advocate for this issue, as it doesn’t just affect the mother and child, but everyone connected to them. If someone you know seems like they are struggling, you need to reach out. Most women will not admit how bad things really. Offer help, check in, be a good friend. When The Bough Breaks is available today on iTunes.

Available on iTunes March 14th  

WRITTEN, DIRECTED AND PRODUCED BY:
Jamielyn Lippman 

PRODUCED BY:
Lindsay Gerszt and Tanya Newbould

FEATURING:
Singer Carnie Wilson
“The Next Food Network Star” chef  Aarti Sequeira 
Real Housewives Of Orange County” star Peggy Tanous

NARRATED BY:
Brooke Shields 

RT: 93 Minutes

Website: 
www.whentheboughbreaksfilm.com

Social Media:
Twitter: @boughbreaksdoc
Official Facebook Page

Review: ‘THE POSSESSION EXPERIMENT’ has haunting visual appeal.

the-possession-experiment-poster

SYNOPSIS:  THE POSSESSION EXPERIMENT tells the story of Brandon (Minor), who has always been drawn to the supernatural.  So when asked to pick a topic to base his final world theology class project on, he decides to explore the dark world of exorcisms. Teamed up with three classmates, the group investigates a multiple homicide that they eventually discover was an exorcism gone horribly wrong. Brandon becomes obsessed with the event, and in a strange turn of events, decides the only way to research this topic is to undergo an exorcism himself.

possession-experiment-image Scott B. Hansen‘s film is a visual feast for most of its run. At moments, it appears to be two different films with any scenes specifically involving the occult are spectacular. They rival any big budget film like The Conjuring. On the other hand, the scenes that are not directly linked to these moments come off as afterthoughts with a low quality to them. The difference between the two is rather astounding. The acting from the majority of the cast is down right atrocious, with three perfromances withstanding this criticism. Lead Chris Minor, who carries the film on his shoulders, does a great job taking on a familiar horror trope with his emtional heart on his sleeve. Jake Brinn, as stoner sidekick Clay, gives a down to earth portrayal.  You could easily think he was plucked from a local college to play this role overnight. Our lady of the hour in The Possession Experiment is actress KT Fanelli. Her commitment to playing a woman too far gon  to save is, frankly, award worthy. Color me impressed with her ability to take on the physicality required to make this a convincing performance. the-possession-experiment-chris-minor-still

While the screenplay may not seem to be anythign new, there is one heck of a clever twist. And the ending, which really doesn’t arrive until you get into the credits, is fantastic. The highest praise I am eager to share about The Possession Experiment is the phenominal practical effects. I actually cringed and looked away several times. As someone who lives and breathes new horror films 3-5 times a week, that’s saying something. Two more positives come with the effective sound editing and an updated live stream concept that brings the script into the 21st century. Not so hidden are the homages to A Nightmare on Elm Street and Rosemary’s Baby. If the acting had been up to par and the ancilary shots matched in quality, this film would most defintely hod its own weight in a world where horror standards get higher every day.

TITLE: THE POSSESSION EXPERIMENT
AVAILABLE ON VOD AND iTUNES:  December 6, 2016
DIRECTOR: Scott B. Hansen
WRITER: ,  Mary J. Dixon, Scott B. Hansen
CAST:  Chris Minor, Jake Brinn, Nicky Jasper with KT Fanelli and Bill Moseley
GENRE: Horror
DISTRIBUTOR: Momentum Pictures

Review: Experience a Mother’s Worst Nightmare in ‘The Diabolical’

This Friday comes a smart and unique horror story of a single mother’s own hellish reality. Thanks to XLrator Media and the directing of Alistair Lengrand, their film The Diabolical will keep you guessing all the way up to the final act. For those of you who are struggling in finding a decent horror film, this one may be worth the watch.

It all began with Madison (Ali Larter) sitting alone on her laptop; her two children, Jacob (Max Rose) and Haley (Chloe Perrin) asleep upstairs. The lights begin to flicker and the pictures on the wall begin to shake. “Not again,” she says. Suddenly a flash of light appears in the doorway where a bloody grotesque being comes crawling out towards her. She backs up and repeats to herself “It’s not real. It’s not real.” Another flash of light appears and the creature is gone. Madison then collects herself, sits back down in her seat and continues on with her night. This opening scene is a big reason why this film is different from your typical horror flick. The story begins with the paranormal phenomena as a pre-existing condition in the characters lives, which actually brings a really interesting side to Madison, Jacob and Haley’s characterization over the course of the film. The film continues on with the small family not only struggling with paranormal disturbances, but also Jacob’s violent behaviour in school and potential foreclosure on their house. After realizing that no one can help her situation, the strong and independent mother takes these problems into her own hands.

Ali Larter gave a solid performance as a protective mother of two. Her co-actors, Chloe Perrin, Max Rose, and Arjun Gupta, who played her son’s science tutor, Nikolai, all had equally as impressive performances. The Diabolical isn’t the greatest horror film of the year, however it is definitely different enough and interesting enough to check out. If you find yourself interested in science fictional side of horror you can find The Diabolical in theaters, VOD and iTunes on October 16th. 

3 1/2 out of 5 stars.

 

Remember why you love LEGOs with ‘A LEGO® Brickumentary’ & 22 LEGO fun facts

ALEGOBRICKUMENTARY_Radius_key_art[imdb id=”tt3214286″ plot=”short”]

Playful and upbeat, you’ll love the classic documentary style with the off-screen narrator, Jason Bateman as the mini-fig guiding you through the LEGO world. From the origins to the fans, this doc takes you through the ups and downs of a company that is all about playing.

Even if you’re not a builder, there’s no denying that the impact of LEGO on society. You’ll find out about how the bricks are being used in children’s therapy, in art and just plain for a good time. After, I guarantee you’ll break out those sets you have hidden away in your closet. They’re not just for kids.

Now in theaters, on demand and on [itunes link=”https://itunes.apple.com/us/movie/a-lego-brickumentary/id1008559472?uo=4″ title=”rent or buy on iTunes” text=”iTunes”]

What’s your favorite LEGO set?
A LEGO® BRICKUMENTARY Still 3

Oscar winning Director Daniel Junge and Oscar Nominated Director Kief Davidson take us on a journey through the LEGO® brand…like you have never seen before. They explore the brick that has captured imaginations for generations and look at the fundamental question – – is it a toy or something more? A LEGO® BRICKUMENTARY delves into the extraordinary impact of the LEGO brick and the innovative uses for it that has sprung up all over the world. The narrative takes us through art galleries full of LEGO creations, introduces us to Master Builders designing and creating life-sized LEGO models (as well as those who employ LEGO bricks to create their own films), leads us into the world of LEGO therapy and brings us along to meet Adult Fans of LEGO (AFOLS), each with amazing stories to tell. A LEGO® BRICKUMENTARY explores the essential nature of human creativity and the ways we seek to build and understand our world. A LEGO® BRICKUMENTARY Still 2 A LEGO® BRICKUMENTARY Still 1

  • Children around the world spend 5 billion hours a year playing with LEGO bricks
  • LEGO bricks are available in 53 different colors.
  • LEGO products are on sale in more than 140
  • The LEGO Club has 5 million members worldwide.
  • On average, every person on earth owns 102 LEGO bricks.
  • With a production of over 650 million tires in 2014, the LEGO Group is one of the world’s largest tire manufacturers.
  • Laid end to end, the number of LEGO bricks produced in 2014 would reach more than 24 times round the world.
  • If you built a column of about 40 billion LEGO bricks, it would reach the moon.
  • Over the years, approx. 760 billion LEGO elements have been manufactured.
  • In 2014, the LEGO Group achieved a global production of more than 60 billion elements – equivalent to approx. 117,000 elements a minute or 1,960 elements every second.
  • In 2014, the 1×1 round plate was the LEGO element pro­duced in the largest numbers. A total of approx. 2 billion 1×1 round plates in various colors were molded. If the transparent version of the 1×1 round plate is added, the total production amounts to approximately 3.4 billion elements.
  • Two eight-stud LEGO bricks of the same color can be combined in 24 different ways. Three eight-stud bricks can be combined in 1,060 ways. There are more than 915 million combinations possible for six 2 x 4 LEGO bricks of the same color.
  • 40 billion LEGO bricks stacked on top of one another would connect the earth with the moon.
  • The LEGO brick has inspired generations of innovators, including Larry Page and Sergey Brin of Google.
  • The LEGO minifigure represents the world’s largest population of people! Over 4 billion minifigures have been produced in the last 30 years. This is almost 12 times the population of the United States!
  • The body of a minifigure is the same height as 3 LEGO bricks stacked on top of one another and the head is 1 LEGO brick high, making it 1 ½ inches tall.
  • The average minifigure – with no hair or accessories – weighs 1/10 of an ounce.
  • There are more than 8 quadrillion (8,181,068,395,500,000) possible combinations of minifigures that can be made using all of the unique minifigure parts over the last 30 years.
  • In 2014, approx. 27 billion LEGO elements were made at the factory in Billund, Denmark – equivalent to more than 3 million elements an hour or approx. 52,000 a minute.
  • In 2014, 6 million sets per week, on average, containing more than 27 billion LEGO elements were packed at the LEGO factory in Monterrey, Mexico.
  • In 2014, more than 550 million minifigures and mini doll figures in total were produced. If you put them next to each other in a line, it would stretch almost 14,000 km. This resembles the trip Billund – Boston – Budapest – Billund.
  • Ole Kirk Kristiansen, the Founder, came up with the name “LEGO” in 1934. He took the first two letters of the Danish words “LEG GODT”, meaning “play well”, and combined them – quite unaware that one meaning of the word in Latin is… “I put together”.

10 years Later… ‘WTC View’ is being released on iTunes. Liz interviews Director Brian Sloan and star Michael Urie

Michael Urie in WTC View. Courtesy of Brian Sloan.

Everyone has their own story. Everyone remembers where they were and what they were doing when they found out about the planes hitting the towers. It was not a good day for our country. Sadness, confusion, fear all still come to mind when allowing ourselves to go back to that day. What many people outside New York will never understand, is what happened the days and months following the attacks on 9/11. WTC View, was released 10 years ago. Tuesday, March 3rd, it is finally available on iTunes. This film is a beautiful glance at the time after the world came to a stop in 2001. What we, as New Yorkers, felt, saw, smelled, heard, and had to process after a day that will never leave us. Read More →

Jeremy’s Review/Interview: ‘Coherence’ Might Be the Most Criminally Underwatched Film of the Year So Far

Coherence-PosterWhen our lovelies Liz and Melissa included James Ward Byrkit‘s Coherence in their Top 10 Films of the Summer, I did a double take. What is this movie which you rate so high? It had not crossed my radar for some reason (I will blame them even though Melissa wrote briefly about it) and I rushed to the interwebs to help me figure out what it was and who made it. When I found out it was written and directed by the same man who received story credit for the Oscar-winning animated film Rango, I was surprised. So when I read that Coherence was, in fact, a science fiction thriller, I went from surprised to being impressed. The thing about good writers is that they can work in multiple genres and are able to create films that can appeal to the different audiences attracted to said genre. Rango was a four-quad film with mass appeal and Johnny Depp as the star. Coherence is the polar opposite and is better off for it. Read More →

Jeremy’s Review of ‘Mutual Friends’, a Rom-Com Fit for NYC

Mutual Friends posterIn a city the size of New York, with so many different personalities and the possibility for literally any situation to arise, it’s no wonder it is the setting for so many romantic comedies. Matthew WattsMutual Friends hits a lot of familiar rom-com notes, but its mumblecore-like narrative without adhering to the tenets of mumblecore (i.e. meandering pseudo-plot with simple, often improvised mundane dialogue) help sets it apart from the many others like it out there commenting on the nature of romance in today’s world. Read More →