Review: There is no denying ‘THE TIME TO CHOOSE’ is Now.

abramorama logoPresents

TIME TO CHOOSE

Narrated by Oscar Isaac

time to choose posterI’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, anyone who thinks climate change is a manufactured idea, to me, is way off the rails. But, if by some chance you’re unconvinced, a new doc is resolved to change your mind. It seems like, with most threatening events in our lives, it is not until they directly affect our own families that we take the time to address them head on. It is much easier to sweep them under the rug or dismiss them as someone else’s problem. TIME TO CHOOSE may be your wake up call.

Chinese Masks

Academy Award®-Winning documentary filmmaker Charles Ferguson (Inside Job, No End in Sight) turns his lens to address worldwide climate change challenges
and solutions in his new film  TIME TO CHOOSE.


Featuring narration by award-winning actor Oscar Isaac, TIME TO CHOOSE leaves audiences understanding not only what is wrong, but what can to be done to fix this global threat.

Ferguson explores the comprehensive scope of the climate change crisis and examines the power of solutions already available. Through interviews with world-renowned entrepreneurs, innovators, thought leaders and brave individuals living on the front lines of   climate change, Ferguson takes an
In-depth look at the remarkable people working to save our planet.

Watershed chemicals in West Virginia

Watershed chemicals in West Virginia. I would not want my children playing in that stream.

The film is presented in a straightforward pitch, presented in parts, using testimonials from everyday people, scientists, innovators, CEOs, and get this… Facts. In the clip below, you can see what happens in West Virginia, in our continued destruction of beautiful mountains and in “cleaning” coal. Trust me when I say, there is nothing clean about it. We are poisoning ourselves in the process. It’s a vicious cycle, perpetuated by the lack of any other major industry existing in the area for folks to make a living from. Our people are killing themselves to not makes ends meet for their families. Something has to give. Take a look at this, and then picture Flint, Michigan in your backyard.

This is a money motivated issue, there is no doubt about it. The U.S. makes $35 Billion dollars in coal profits annually (That’s billion with a ‘”B”). $375 Billion in electricity profits. Why would those involved in sickening/ripping off Americans want to change anything? Here’s the thing, by 2017 renewable energy will cost less than fossil fuels. So, laugh all you want at electric cars, wind, and solar power. As for me, I’ll be laughing all the way to the bank, along with those who get it. Chinese MasksWith breathtaking cinematography, including awe-inspiring aerial shots, an uplifting score, and the sincere and heartfelt narration by Oscar Isaac, TIME TO CHOOSE is a winning film. With all of these elements combined, we have no excuse but to sit up and pay attention. We have a duty to protect our children. We cannot afford to ignore the reality we’ve created.  As Unilever CEO, Paul Polman says in the film, “It’s too late to be a pessimist.” Now is the TIME TO CHOOSE.

In Theaters June 3, 2016

One day screening events on June 15thThe filmmakers have have partnered
 with Gathr® Films to use Theatrical On Demand® to bring TIME TO CHOOSE 
to local theaters across the country over the Summer and into the Fall

RT: 97 Minutes
               

Original Music by The Misshapes

Featuring:

Dr. Jane Goodall 

Steven Chu (Former US Energy Secretary)

Michael Pollan (Author, In Defense of Food)

Michael Brune (President, The Sierra Club)

Kumi Naidoo (Executive Director, Greenpeace International)

Jerry Brown (Governor, California)

Lyndon Ryve (Co-Founder, CEO SolarCity)

Paul Polman (CEO, Unilever)

Amory Lovins (Chief Scientist, Rocky Mountain Institute)

Danny Kennedy (Co-Founder, Sungevity)

Peter Agnefjall (CEO, IKEA)

Eric Luo (CEO, Shunfeng)

Jesse Moore (Founder, M-Kopa)
 
& More

Make the choice, for more information please visit: http://www.timetochoose.com

Facebook: Facebook.com/TimeToChooseFilm
Twitter: @Time2ChooseFilm
Instagram: TimeToChooseFilm
#TimeToChoose 

Review: Shedding Light on ‘Chloe and Theo’

Chloe and Theo posterIt all began with a dream. A dream that the world would receive a fatal kiss from the sun and the ice in the north would retreat. Director and screenwriter, Ezna Sands exhibits the concerns for our environmental well-being in his heartfelt cli-fi (climate change fiction), Chloe and Theo.

Theo (Theo Ikummaq), an Arctic Inuit man, was told about this dream from his elders, and if the “south” did not change their ways, destruction will overcome the earth. He was then sent to New York City to shed light on the world’s end, and he is immediately overwhelmed by the environment. The sun was blocked out by the skyscrapers, people constantly on the move; there was not a single moment of silence. This is where he meets Chloe (Dakota Johnson), a young runaway, and Bruce Lee devotee. “Together they will change the world.”

Dakota Johnson and first time actor Theo Ikummaq did a fantastic job with their roles as Chloe and Theo. The film brings a different side to storytelling, with both characters playing a sort of narrative role. Theo telling the story as it was occurring, and Chloe telling the story as though it already had happened. Mira Sorvino as Monica and Andre De Shields as Mr. Sweet, played crucial characters to Chloe and Theo’s story by showing how hard it is to get something globally recognized. Mr. Sweet, a man who Chloe is close friends with on the streets, opens Chloe and Theo’s eyes to the difficulty of getting people with power to listen. Although the sound mixing could have used more work, the shots and occasional use of animation were beautifully implemented throughout.

Overall, Chloe and Theo is a simple film, with a powerful message. Through a story of unlikely friendships, it brings light to our climate changes and their impact on our world. You can watch Chloe and Theo in select theaters and on VOD September 4th.

3 1/2 out of 5 stars.

Jeremy’s Review – Dena Seidel’s Fantastic Antarctic Edge: 70° South Is Yet Another in a Series of Wake-Up Calls About Climate Change

antarctic_posterWhile it still absolutely amazes me that anyone can refute or deny that climate change is happening and changing the complexion of our planet, it doesn’t hurt to have as much ammunition to use to back it all up. Director Dena Seidel‘s Antarctic Edge: 70° South is in depth look at one of many projects scientists are undertaking to measure the damage being done to Antarctica and thus to the Earth.

antarctic edge 1

The film follows a group of scientists on their yearly sojourn to the western peninsula of Antarctica to conduct a series of tests covering everything from the amount of ice melt to the amount of krill in the water to the Adelie penguin populations and whether they are flourishing or not. And what is stressed is that Antarctica basically sets the tone for the weather on Earth. Because of the currents that swirl around it and push water throughout the planet, its health is of ultimate importance. As the Antarctic ice/snow melt, not only does the surface area that reflects sun/heat back into the atmosphere get smaller, but the water temperature rises allowing for massive storms like Hurricane Sandy to form as well as cut the ocean’s ability to trap carbon, which is phytoplankton use for photosynthesis to grow who, in turn, serve as food for krill who are likewise eaten by whales and penguins. Whew. So needless to say, this complicated series of events taking place in Antarctica effect the entire planet.

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Where Seidel really excels is presenting this complex information in a way that is comsumable for an average, non-science savvy viewer. The scientists, from the ornithologists studying the penguins to those studying the amount of carbon in krill urine, to the crew on the ship carrying these folks, are all incredibly charismatic and relatable. Without this, the material being presented might better be suited for a TedTalk than a documentary. This is a film that teaches as it unfolds, which is key. There has been several other Antarctica-focused films that have come out in the last few years, chief among them are Werner Herzog‘s Encounters at the End of the World and Anthony Powell‘s Antarctica: A Year on the Ice (read my review here), but none of them tackle this particular aspect of the Antarctic story. This film fills a unique space in the lore of the least populated continent on the planet and that brings the challenges that not only the continent faces but the Earth does to the forefront. And while there are many lasting images and warnings in the film, perhaps the most moving is by Philippines Climate Commissioner Naderev Sano, whose testimony at the very outset of the film highlighting what Super Typhoon Haiyan did to his country (as well as many other climate-related events) and the need for action. While I can’t find the specific clip in the film, this one covers some of the same pleas he makes.

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At 72 minutes, this film won’t hit you over the head with the information it presents. While the message the film contains is somewhat dire, it still has tinges of hope. What needs to be done to reverse climate change rests on the shoulders of the humans inhabiting the planet. Hopefully this film will add to the voices yelling in favor of action. I really enjoyed this film and I hope many more do as well.

Antarctic Edge: 70° South opens today at Quad Cinema in New York City. Here is a list of other upcoming screenings.

Here’s the trailer: