Tribeca Film Festival Review/Interview: ‘DETOUR’ is a modern noir with two sides of one story.

Tribeca Film Festival logo 2016

detour, tye, emory, bel

Sometimes in life, a single instance, a momentary decision, is something we wish we could change. Thinking that if only you had said something else, gone the other way, chosen another path, your life might be completely different. These “what ifs” might haunt us but unless you’re a Time Lord there isn’t much you can do about them. That doesn’t stop us from wondering what life would be like. In a Tribeca Film Festival world premiere, DETOUR takes us on a ride that begs that very notion.

Harper, a seemingly naive law student, obsesses over the idea that his shifty stepfather is somehow involved in the devastating car crash that leaves his mother lying comatose in the hospital. He drowns his suspicions in whiskey and, with little forethought, finds himself suddenly entwined in conversation with a volatile grifter, Johnny, and his stripper companion, Cherry. As daylight breaks and the haziness of promises made becomes clearer, how will Harper handle the repercussions—and the violent duo—on his doorstep?

From director Christopher Smith (Creep, Black Death, Triangle), Detour is a stylized noir throwback with a trio of lead performances by of-the-moment actors: Tye Sheridan (Mud, The Tree of Life), Emory Cohen (Brooklyn) and Bel Powley (Diary of a Teenage Girl). Utilizing a unique split-narrative structure to tell his tale of deception and murder, Smith takes his audience on a twisty, thrilling ride, where it’s never quite clear what or whom can be trusted.

Detour-bel

The cast, comprised of Hollywood’s young up and comers Tye Sheridan, Emory Cohen, and Bel Powley, make this noir throwback as successful as it is. With suspicion and grief fueled motives and a $20,000 agreement, murder and mayhem are the goal. Powley, coming off her extraordinary breakout performance in Diary Of A Teenage Girl, is a stunning presence on screen. Caught somewhere between girl next door and Middle American white-trash, her quiet strength and sympathetic nature make the character of Cherry more intriguing than one might think. Emory Cohen, who was completely unrecognizable from his appearance in Brooklyn, takes on the role of Johnny with vigor. With a badass exterior, and hair trigger temper, Cohen’s  best moments are built in fear and protection. Tye Sheriden‘s Harper is whip smart and more cunning than at first glance. This young man is so incredibly comfortable in his own skin, he probably could have played Johnny had he and Cohen’s wardrobe’s been reversed. Detour-tye

Writer/Director Christopher Smith‘s script is sharp. While I knew about the multi-narrative plot going in, I wasn’t expecting to have to remain on my toes as much as I did. In fact, when I initially left the theater, I waxed poetic with a colleague for a good 25 minutes. The more I thought about it, the more I liked it. I would be remiss if I didn’t mention the glorious look of the film. Shot on wide-angle lenses in South Africa (which is skillfully made to look like a road trip from America to just across the border into Mexico), Smith’s choices of color and set dressing are key to the ever so slight differentiation in the two narratives. I completely agree with producer Julie Baines, who I was fortunate enough to run into during interviews, who backed up the notion that once you’ve seen the film for the first time, you’ll want to go back and follow the breadcrumbs knowing what you now know. That is exactly how I felt the morning after. I needed to see it again. Baines also reinforced the infectious chemistry between the three leads, both on and off the screen. Think a more complex version of Sliding Doors with a noir aspect. Detour is aptly named.

I was able to sit down with Tye, Emory and Chris over the weekend. You can listen to a spirited and totally down-to-earth interview below. Ladies and Gentleman, Tye Sheridan, Emory Cohen, and Christopher Smith on their new film DETOUR… (and other musings). Enjoy!

 

Remaining screenings at the fest are Rush only, but definitely worth trying to check out now!

4:00 PM – THU 4/21 BOW TIE CINEMAS CHELSEA 9Icon-fg-map RUSH
9:30 PM – FRI 4/22 REGAL CINEMAS BATTERY PARK 11-1Icon-fg-map RUSH

9 movies from the New York Film Festival you can watch this fall

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Philippe Petit (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) in TriStar Pictures' THE WALK.

Philippe Petit (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) in TriStar Pictures’ THE WALK.

The Walk – In theaters now

Summary:

Truly a Robert Zemeckis film, The Walk is best watched as Liz and I did – IMAX 3D. Even those with only a slight fear of heights will be kept pinned to their seats, gripping the armchair, as we both did. There’s so much to appreciate about people who have dreams.


 

ST. JAMES PLACEBridge of Spies – in theaters now

Summary:

 

EXPERIMENTER-2Experimenter – in theaters & VOD now

Summary:

The story behind the story, Experimenter tells the tale of the man as he begins the most famous of his experiments. With several high-profile cameos, director Michael Almereyda uses several creative ways to punch up ordinary scenes.



 

 

Heart of a DogHeart of a Dog – in theaters October 21st

Summary:

Michael Stuhlbarg, Michael Fassbender, Kate Winslet Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs – nationwide October 23rd

Summary:

Liz’s non-iPhone user review here!


 

Brooklyn-2Brooklyn – in theaters November 6th

Summary:

 

MIA MADRE_1304Mia Madre – in theaters November 6th

Summary:

Liz loved it! Find out why in her review!


 

Ingrid Bergman In Her Own Words-1

Ingrid Bergman – In Her Own Words – in theaters November 13th

Summary:

Liz tells you why you’ll love the personal story of the Hollywood starlet in her review!


 

(L-R) KYLE CHANDLER and CATE BLANCHETT star in CAROL

(L-R) KYLE CHANDLER and CATE BLANCHETT star in CAROL

Carol – in theaters December 18th

Summary:

What did I think of it? Find out in my review!

Fox Searchlight Changes Release Date for ‘Brooklyn’ Starring Saoirse Ronan

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Fox Searchlight changes the release date for BROOKLYN starring Saoirse Ronan, Domhnall Gleeson, Emory Cohen, with Jim Broadbent and Julie Walters. The film now opens in select theaters on Wednesday November 4th

BROOKLYN  tells the profoundly moving story of Eilis Lacey (Saoirse Ronan), a young Irish immigrant navigating her way through 1950’s Brooklyn. Lured by the promise of America, Eilis departs Ireland and the comfort of her mother’s home for the shores of New York City. The initial shackles of homesickness quickly diminish as a fresh romance sweeps Eilis into the intoxicating charm of love. But soon, her new vivacity is disrupted by her past, and Eilis must choose between two countries and the lives that exist within.

 

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Review: “Fort Tilden” is a generational face palm.

fort tilden posterIt’s a generation that makes you want to punch them. Millennials aren’t  all bad, that’s definitely not what I’m saying, but we all know a few bad apples… or orchards that give us the feeling of arson. I’m sure that 10 years ago, when I was 25, someone wanted to strangle me over whatever drama seemed life threatening at the moment. Let’s be serious though, it’s a running joke that we have a real problem with a generation that we just have to urge to physically shake until their bobble heads fall off… but we don’t… because sometimes it’s such delicious fodder that sitting back and watching is much less stressful and way more entertaining, as long as they don’t disrupt your way of living, of course. Enter onto the scene, festival favorite Fort Tilden.fort tilden 5The entire plot of the film ( Harper and Allie try all day to get to the beach) is pretty much the perfect metaphor for their reality. Fort Tilden is bravely tongue in cheek but also unapologetically the truth. Shiny objects distract, social media owns them, money might as well be made exclusively by Monopoly, and yet someway, somehow they make their way through this world and promptly demand a cookie. They have balls and you have to respect that. Bridey Elliott‘s performance as Harper, daughter of a CEO and self proclaimed “artist” is brash, rude, and does not care what you think. Elliott is hilarious in her sincerity. Clare McNulty as manic and failed overachiever Allie, is sweet and high strung and equally as genuine in her performance as Elliot. The two are a fantastic match with a genius give and take. Their ability to whine, complain, ignore everyone and make it both endearing and horrendous should earn them attention and applause.fort tilden 1The quarter life crisis now seems much longer and much more ridiculous that ever before. One the flip side of the coin, Fort Tilden is also ans awesome commentary on the lack of parenting going on today. Virtual high fives to writer/directors Sarah-Violet Bliss and Charles Rogers for throwing the millennial cliche in out faces so damn well.  Fort Tilden makes it way to theaters and VOD Friday, August 14. Get There.

Jeremy’s Review: Documentary ‘Born to Fly’ About Dancer/Choreographer Elizabeth Streb Reaches Great Heights

born to fly posterI will admit that I am largely ignorant of dance and its history. Sure I can name George Balanchine, Bob Fosse and Bill T. Jones, but that’s because of the trivia buff in me. So going into Catherine Gund‘s Born to Fly, I had no idea who Elizabeth Streb is or anything about her aesthetic. Needless to say, this incredibly engaging documentary changed all of that. Read More →

Jeremy Goes to the Indy Film Fest: ‘Fort Tilden’ Is a Hilarious and Poignant Snapshot of Privileged Millennial Discontent

Many are the films that depict the haze that young people are in once they graduate from college. Few are the films that depict that haze in a convincing and fresh way. To me, Noah Baumbach‘s Kicking & Screaming has always been the bellwether in this cinematic realm. Many have tried and mostly all have failed to capture what he, his cast and crew did with that film. Now, enter Fort Tilden, a quirky film about two women, Harper (Bridey Elliott) and Allie (Clare McNulty), who make a plan to go to the beach at Fort Tilden, New York City, to meet up with two boys they met the night before. It treads on this same cinematic terrain and succeeds admirably. Read More →

Liz’s ‘Thanksgiving’ Review: Let’s Talk Turkey and Truth

ThanksgivingPosterOver the holiday weekend, I went to a typical NYC rooftop party. The company was comprised mostly of young lawyers and investment bankers in their mid to late twenties. When one girl complained about the Lower East Side becoming irrelevant, I was perplexed. ” Why?” (an audible Freudian slip). She explained, “Every five feet, they’re are strollers and children! It’s so obnoxious!”  I have to say I was genuinely offended. At 34 and kids on the brain, I was angry. Was I ever like this at parties?! Truth is, I probably was. Cue the ashamed shoulder slump and face palm. Read More →