Review: ‘THE ASSIGNMENT’ flips the script on your average action flick.

THE ASSIGNMENTDirector Walter Hill gives the revenge film a modern neo-noir twist with this electrifying thriller. Hitman Frank Kitchen (Michelle Rodriguez) is given a lethal assignment, but after being double-crossed, discovers he’s no longer the man he was.  Having been surgically altered, Frank now has the body of a woman. Seeking vengeance, he heads for a showdown with his assailant (Sigourney Weaver), a brilliant surgeon with a chilling agenda of her own.

The film is structured in a Sin City meets iZombie format with graphic novel transitions and narration. The premise is interesting and certainly engages your attention without pause. The Assignment has caused some stir in the transgender community, as our hero/villain’s view of his/her transition is on the rather negative side. That being said, if you woke up the opposite gender, you might be a tad peeved as well. The action is tempered with monologues from Sigourney Weaver‘s character. My only complaint there? I wish there had been more visual to back those stories up as some run at quite a length.Michelle Rodriguez does a great job with both genders, keeping the masculine edge once she wakes up a woman. Without prior knowledge of the plot, you may think that a very thin Oscar Isaac had tackled the first half of the role. It’s pretty uncanny. Her past work in action films is on full view with her natural handling of weapons and aggressive presence. `It’s a pretty fearless performance. Weaver as Dr. Kay has an eccentric air to her speech patterns and carriage, even when she’s in a straight jacket. Tony Shaloub as Dr.Galen is a perfect foil for Weaver and the appearance by Anthony LaPaglia is casting heaven. On the whole. The Assignment is different in a good way. Engrossing and lively, you can’t go wrong. Check out the trailer below.

In Select Theaters and On Demand April 7th

 

Directed by: Walter Hill
Screenplay by: Walter Hill, Denis Hamill
Story by: Denis Hamill, Walter Hill
Producers: Said Ben Said, Michel Merkt
Cast: Michelle Rodriguez, Tony Shalhoub, Anthony LaPaglia, Caitlin Gerard, Sigourney Weaver
Distributor Saban Films, Lionsgate
Release Date: Ultra VOD on March 3rd, in select theaters April 7th
Running Time 95 minutes

Rating

Synopsis:

R

Director Walter Hill gives the revenge film a modern neo-noir twist with this electrifying thriller. Hitman Frank Kitchen (Michelle Rodriguez) is given a lethal assignment, but after being double-crossed, discovers he’s no longer the man he was.  Having been surgically altered, Frank now has the body of a woman. Seeking vengeance, he heads for a showdown with his assailant (Sigourney Weaver), a brilliant surgeon with a chilling agenda of her own.

Picturehouse Debuts Poster for the Upcoming Film ‘Big Stone Gap’

Big Stone Gap

Picturehouse has released the poster for the  upcoming all-star ensemble film Big Stone Gap and we have it for you above! The film is written and directed by Adriana Trigiani (The Shoemaker’s Wife) and is based on her best-selling novel of the same name.

Big Stone Gap , shot entirely on location in Trigiani’s hometown, is the story of proud working people and their lives in a coal mining town nestled in the southwest corner of Virginia, deep in the Appalachian Mountains. Ave Maria Mulligan (Ashley Judd), the town’s self-proclaimed spinster, has resigned herself to a quiet life of singlehood and being useful. She works in her family’s pharmacy, delivers the prescriptions herself, and directs the town’s annual outdoor drama until one day she learns of a long-buried family secret that changes the course of her life forever.

The film also stars Patrick Wilson, Whoopi Goldberg, John Benjamin Hickey, Jane Krakowski, Anthony LaPaglia, Jenna Elfman, Jasmine Guy and Judith Ivey.

Picturehouse will release the film nationwide on October 9th

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Twitter: @BSGmovie, #BigStoneGapMovie

Jeremy’s Review: Stephen King Adapts His Own Novella in ‘A Good Marriage’

StephenKing'sAGoodMarriage_PosterWhen you hear that Stephen King, the master of modern horror, is finally adapting one of his own works for the big screen, it’s easy to take notice. When you look at the principal two cast members of A Good Marriage in Joan Allen (who I adored in Searching for Bobby Fischer and The Ice Storm) and Anthony Lapaglia there something more to get excited about. Even though the last piece of fiction I read by King was Bag of Bones which was released in 1998, I still had high hopes for this project which is directed by Peter Askin whose documentary Trumbo was stunningly good. Does it lives up to its pedigree? Let’s take a look. Read More →