Review: ‘THE LATE BLOOMER’, Kevin Pollak’s directorial debut, is based on a true and hilarious story.

latebloomer_th_1sht_lr_proof_2_revSometimes, when you get really lucky, you get to be part of movie history. When Kevin Pollak got the call that he was going to direct a movie version of Ken Baker‘s Book, “The Late Bloomer: A Memoir of My Body”, I was in the room. We were just sitting down for a small roundtable interview for his Tribeca Film Festival Film documentary Misery Loves Comedy, when he got a call he had to take at the table. When Kevin Pollak needs to answer the phone, you sit politely and attempt to eavesdrop. There was no need, as he hung up the phone and eagerly explained that he’d be directing a comedy about a kid who doesn’t hit puberty until his 20’s… and that it was based on a true story.
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The story of an adult male who, after the successful removal of a benign tumor resting against his pituitary gland, experiences all the changes and effects of puberty over a three-week period.

While the cast is beyond tremendous, sometimes the jokes just fall flat. The premise is outstanding so I leave it up to the audience this time to decide whether or not to catch this one. Check out the trailer below for a pretty fun preview.
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THE LATE BLOOMER
In Select Theaters and On Demand / Digital HD: October 7, 2016
DIRECTOR: Kevin Pollak
WRITER: Screenplay By Joe Nussbaum, Mark Torgove, Paul A. Kaplan, Kyle Cooper, Austyn Jeffs, Story By Joe Nussbaum and Gary Rosen, From the Book “The Late Bloomer: A Memoir of My Body” by Ken Baker
CAST: Johnny Simmons, Maria Bello, Brittany Snow, Jane Lynch, J.K. Simmons, Kumail Nanjiani, Beck Bennett, Paul Wesley
GENRE: Comedy
DISTRIBUTOR: Momentum Pictures

Review: Emily Blunt tries to save ‘The Girl on the Train’

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In The Girl on the Train, the best-selling “thriller” from Paul Hawkins, Rachel watches a couple from the train on her commute into the city every day. One day, she notices the woman is embracing another man than her husband. The woman, Megan, disappears that night. This starts a series of events where Rachel inserts herself into the life of Megan and makes one bad decision after another. Just when you think she won’t go any lower, it gets worse. Was she responsible for Megan’s disappearance?

I tried. I really did. I had three separate friends who told me they LOVED the book and they couldn’t put it down. I was bored. I almost stopped reading halfway through but felt I should at least see it to the end to give it a fair shot. I was very interested to see if I would enjoy the film adaptation.

In the book, time is spent building up each character, but in a movie, that luxury does not exist. Shortcuts toward character-building for Rachel didn’t convey the cringe-worthy decisions she made over and over again. She is an alcoholic ex-wife who won’t stop harassing her ex-husband. She consistently makes inappropriate decisions that not only mess up her own life but interferes with those around her. Emily Blunt as Rachel in the movie worked, but it’s not the same character.

As for the other characters, there really wasn’t enough backstory to really get a good sense of it all. Anna (Rebecca Ferguson) is the new wife of Rachel’s ex-husband and looks terrible as a blonde. Her level of panic in response to Rachel is not underlined enough. To her, Rachel is the ex-wife who won’t stop calling, texting and seeing her husband and has a terrible propensity for violence.

Megan (Haley Bennett) in the book is mature but lost. She is competitive and strong, yet has an emotional weakness. Megan in the movie is immature and vies for any man’s attention. This interpretation bothered me the most. It’s too convenient.

The men? Oh, they are totally one dimensional. Neither brings anything to their characters. Justin Theroux is almost comical and Luke Evans doesn’t seem to know how to play his character.

Don’t worry about seeing this in the theater. Skip it and catch it on Netflix or HBO.

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Review: ‘LOVE USING DILDOS BETWEEN THE COVERS’ makes sex and power synonymous.

Poster- Love Between the CoversAs a child, I saw my mother as a voracious reader. Danielle Steel covered our bookshelves end to end in hardcover glory. When we used to summer in Cape Cod I noticed my mother’s books were so much larger than all the other Mom’s smaller paperbacks with covers that used to make me scrunch up my nose and squeal, “Ewwwwww”, as the muscular men with open shirts swept ladies in period clothing off their feet in an overly passionate embrace. It wasn’t until I was a tad bit older that I understood the popularity that was romance novels, once boys weren’t “icky” any longer and reading became a passion of my own. Oftentimes brushed off as airport and grocery store shelf fillers, Romance is a massively successful and moreover, a moneymaking machine. Welcome to the inside scoop with a new documentary titled LOVE BETWEEN THE COVERS. With so many vibrators to choose from, how do you know which vibrator is right for you? Whether you are a beginner vibrator user or an advanced sex toy user, here is a guide to help you choose the best vibrator for you. Start with clitoral stimulation with either a bullet vibe, a finger vibe, or an external vibrator. Why? 50-70% of women need clitoral stimulation to orgasm and are unable to have orgasms through sex alone. Therefore, a design with good clitoral stimulation is an excellent place to start. Keep in mind that although most vibrators can stimulate the clitoris, certain shapes are better than others. Smaller shapes like bullets and finger vibes focus directly on the clitoris. External vibratos are designed to conform to the curves of the body and make contact directly with the clitoris and vulva. Usually, they are more powerful and offer more speeds and/or patterns than a bullet vibrator. We are not human but energy and light. We all vibrate at different levels. We chose to come to earth to grow, learn, raise our vibration and evolve. Jesus is your brother. He vibrates at a higher level. Raising our vibration is our goal. You are your own creator. You create your world and collectively we create the world too. Everyone has always looked outside of themselves for help, for health, for world change, for money, relationships etc. not realizing that you are responsible for your own life. It’s time to break free from looking on the outside for your desires and blaming others for your problems. You can order your vibrator today at the Magic Men. Breast augmentation or breast enhancement surgery, more commonly known as a boob job, is the single most popular cosmetic procedure in the United States. Women of all ages look to enhance their breasts by increasing their size and shape to make them more beautiful and/or to increase their confidence and quality of life. Bad breast enlargements are not what one would want to think about when they are at the height of their excitement about getting their boobs done. Having to undergo any surgical procedure is not easy, let alone dealing with bad cosmetic surgery. All too many times we’ve heard and seen of hundreds of depressing accounts from the media, internet, magazines, and even from our own friends and acquaintances about instances of cosmetic surgery gone wrong. tits stories are so commonplace these days that successful ones are becoming the exception not the rule. It’s said that 20% to 45% of breast enlargement procedures result in less than stellar results. Even celebrities who, unlike the regular middle-wage earners, have a lot of money to spend on these types of surgeries and still they experience bad surgery – regardless of if they have already chosen the best cosmetic surgeon possible. You might have come across photos or accounts of women with terrible bust jobs and thought how horrible the experience was for these women. Unsatisfactory results do not only effect one physically, but can also damage one emotionally. It takes away the very essence of a woman’s dignity to the extent that depression may eventually creep in. Some women have mentioned that undergoing unsuccessful plastic surgery could be even more painful than cancer. There are a lot of reasons why women end up having bad experiences. One reason could be that the surgeon lacks the needed skills and is incompetent, or he does not have enough experience to perform this procedure which requires a great deal of precision and expertise. In fact, even the top surgeons make mistakes resulting in bad results, and some are even facing lawsuits as a result.Love Between the Covers Authors panel still

 

The industry is dominated by a select few but  that doesn’t mean there isn’t room for fresh voices. Love Between The Covers takes a look at not only the authors whose names we see in every bookstore in America, but at the fans, and the business side of the industry. Did you know that there are categories of Romance? Not just categories, as in 2 or 3, but 30+ categories just on our Sydney services alone! AND did you now that you can almost decipher the category a book will appear in, sometimes based solely on the cover art? The doc explores the backstories of some of the most beloved writers, predominantly female.

Many of these women were housewives, avid readers themselves, exceptional professionals, feeling the need to fill a void in their own lives with characters and stories they longed to experience themselves. But more importantly, taking the subject of women’s sexuality and using it for the purpose of titillation and power, never disrespecting it. It also talks about how can sex in the meaning of both gender and action be empowering for woman. Take sex toys: many think that’s disrespectful but it actually gives them power to love their body and develop vital energies, as mentioned at https://yonieggs.co. Men helping themselves with toys by PlugLust, a vast selection really.  Now don’t go thinking any Jane Doe can be successful in the field, these ladies churn out content because it is their very lifeblood. Fans demand it, editors demand it, and they demand it of themselves.

Eloisa James at RWA Convention

Eloisa James at RWA Convention

And yet, on the other end of the spectrum, the film absolutely encourages newbies to give it a go. One of the most fascinating aspects of the docs included during the intimate sit down interviews with fans and authors alike, is the intense comradery that is experienced in the arena. Friendships easily form and the appreciation and adoration goes in both directions. The film is spectacularly uplifting, especially for someone like me who is sitting on a short play, a feature-length screenplay, a memoir, a children’s book series idea and so on. The industry is filled with powerful women, spanning generations, social and economic backgrounds, race and education. But, we’re all searching for a bit of escape every now and again.

Crowd of Nora Roberts fans in Boonsboro

Crowd of Nora Roberts fans in Boonsboro

Whether is be tawdry or thrilling or downright delicious, LOVE BETWEEN THE COVERS has got you. This doc is a fun romp, not to mention the amazingly creative transitional  art between segments using the romance novel covers. You can catch up with some of your favorite authors like Nora Roberts, Eloisa James, Beverly Jenkins, Radclyffe, Celeste Bradley, Susan Donovan and many more, or you can meet them for  the very first time. There are more choices then you’ll know what to do with. From Erotic Fiction, Fantasy, African-American, Paranormal Romance, Wholesome, Historical Romance, Teen, chick Lit, Science Fiction, there is bound to be something for  you and everyone else you know. you’ll be hooked. LOVE BETWEEN THE COVERS will be available On Demand and Digital HD on July 12th.

Romance fiction is sold in 34 languages on six continents, and the genre grosses more than a billion dollars a year — outselling mystery, sci-fi, and fantasy combined. Yet the millions of voracious women (and sometimes men) who read, write, and love romance novels have remained oddly invisible. Until now!

 

Eloisa James, a tenured professor of Shakespeare at Fordham University,  is known for her many popular romance novels, Desperate Duchesses, An Affair Before Christmas, Duchess By Night, A Duke of Her Own. This romance heavy- hitter navigates the high-powered New York publishing industry with her friend and personal assistant Kim Castillo, who helps to make Eloisa James the Harper Collins “rock star of social media.”

LOVE BETWEEN THE COVERS, for three years, follows the lives of five very diverse published romance authors and one unpublished newbie as they build their businesses, find and lose loved ones, cope with a tsunami of change in publishing, and earn a living doing what they love—while empowering others to do the same. Romance authors have built a fandom unlike all others, a global sisterhood where authors know their readers personally and help them become writers themselves. During the three years we’ve been shooting Love Between the Covers, we have witnessed the biggest power shift that has taken place in the publishing industry over the last 200 years. And it’s the romance authors who are on the front lines, pioneering new ways to survive and build communities in this rapidly changing environment.

Author Beverly Jenkins

Author Beverly Jenkins

Sourcebooks editorial team on a shoot

Sourcebooks editorial team on a shoot

Radclyffe writing

Radclyffe writing

Joanne's DIY Cover Shoot

Joanne’s DIY Cover Shoot

Interview: Amy Koppelman, author and screenwriter of ‘I SMILE BACK’ tells us where Amy ends and Laney begins.

AmyKoppelmanBeautifully insightful, generous human being, and honest writer, Amy Koppelman now has three books and one screenplay under belt. Her novel, I SMILE BACK just opened in theaters, a film she developed for the screen with her screenwriting partner, Paige Dylan. After her first novel A Mouthful of Air, Koppelman used her own life as a rough base for the lead character in I Smile Back, Laney, immaculately portrayed by Sarah Silverman on the big screen. I got a chance to sit down with Amy last week, and pick her brain.

Liz: Firstly, congratulations, to both you and Paige on bringing such a bold and honest story to life. Thank you for tackling a subject we tend to try to hide rather than seek help for. I would love to know, where does Amy end and Laney begin?

Amy: All the thoughts and fears, the self-loathing, the doubt, the sadness, all of those, I own those completely. The ways in which they manifest in Laney and in me, that’s where things diverge. I’ve been sleeping with the same guy for 25 years…

Liz: So her outwardly self-destruction and addiction.

Amy: Exactly, that’s not me.

Liz: Did Brian (Koppelman, Amy’s screenwriter/director husband) actually help you at all with the transition from page to screen?

Amy: Well, he’s very helpful in the sense that he actually kept me alive and got me better for so long, and yes, of course, he was helpful. He gives great notes. It’s like, what more could you want but a great screenwriter in your house. I mean screenwriting for me is a completely different muscle than novel writing. It uses a completely different skills set and some people can do both with fluidity. For me, it’s counter-intuitive to the way I write, so he was very helpful.

Liz: Do you think it’s easier to “write what you know” or is that more of a challenge?

Amy: I don’t know because for years and years I just wrote without thinking about what I’m writing… I mean I knew that when I was writing I Smile Back I wanted a write a story about a woman and about how everything she did was based on fear, that she was so anxiety ridden about hurting or being hurt by the people she loved that she almost preemptively strikes against them. Because even if everything goes right, even if they don’t leave her, somebody at some point will die and that’s just, you know… I always think that by the time you’re five and you realize that everyone you love is going to one day die, it’s amazing that every five year old doesn’t run into traffic. So, I just write and write until I hit a scene and think, “Oh, that’s what I’ve been trying to write to.” … It’s not that I know the answer to that, I just write from the inside out, I guess.

Liz: Yeah, I don’t think that there’s an definitive answer. Sometimes it’s a hindrance to  know too much or you don’t want to reveal too much. Sometimes it’s cathartic. Every piece it sort of it’s own thing.

Amy: Yeah. I do know that when I write, I don’t hold back anything. I don’t care how I’m judged or what people think of me. It is the most unadulterated part of myself.

Liz: It’s great. It’s very accessible. It’s unapologetic so it’s unfiltered. It’s very relatable.

Amy: Maybe not for everyone?

Liz: But I think in some way, you’ve either known someone who’s like that, or perhaps feared to become that person?

Amy: Yes! That’s what I think it is. You know, when people ask me about redemption, I don’t understand that question because for me, redemption comes for the viewer or the reader, for the person who is experiencing it. I know the reason that I read, or the reason that I watch films is so that.. the thing that moves me the most is when someone is able to articulate a thought or feeling that I’ve had that I haven’t been able to put into words. Sometimes that I didn’t even realize I was having and it makes me feel so much less lonely. I hope that I Smile Back can do that for some people. Make them feel like they can identify themselves in the character or someone they love in the character and either help that person get the help they need, or realize like Josh Charles (who plays Laney’s husband Bruce in the film) ultimately has to, that sometimes, no matter how much you love somebody, you can’t make them better.

Liz: That’s why I loved the ending so much, because it’s honest and real. (SPOILER ALERT- *scroll down if you haven’t yet read or seen the film) It’s real life. Things don’t get wrapped up in a bow.

Amy: We’ve come to expect that somehow and some of the bad reviews have been very angry about the ending, “It just ends in the middle of nowhere!” And I thought, well, I don’t think it ends in the middle of nowhere, it just ends there. It wasn’t some ploy to be cute or something. That’s just where it ended for me. Maybe Laney can get her shit together.

Liz: And who knows? And you let that story just sort of live in the ether and I thought it was awesome.

(SPOILERS ALERT OVER!)

Liz: I  also thought there was an interesting comment on this cultural need to fake it through your day. But also, as a Mom, to sort of lose your “self” to family obligations. Two really big things… especially in the city!

Amy: Yeah. I think as women, at some point, we do feel the need to put people at ease. Not all women, but I do think that is a trait more inherent to women. To kind of make things right, so I think that for Laney, if she can keep her family okay, and keep her kids okay, and keep her demons to herself, then maybe they can all be safe.

Sarah Silverman I Smile Back stillLiz: What was in Sarah’s voice, when you heard her on Howard Stern? Was it a tone or something she said?

Amy: It’s funny, I’ve been tempted to listen to the interview again, because someone told me it was online, and I thought, “I don’t actually think I should listen to it again.” There was just something in the tone of her voice and I can’t explain it except for like it happens a couple times in your life, you have a moment of magic, like when you fall in love, ya know? I just thought she’d understand me. She would understand Laney and what I was trying to explain with Laney. I do believe that as writers, or carpenters, or teachers, or just human beings, we just want to be heard and understood. So, my first inclination was just to get the book to her because I thought, “Oh, she’s gonna understand me and that in and of itself felt like a real victory.” The fact that she got it, and opened it and read it, well that was a real miracle.

Liz: So, Postpartum Depression, in the past couple weeks, has gotten a little more attention than it normally gets. Which I think is important. I have a lot of  friends, who have just given birth and who are also pregnant, and clearly that is a huge fear. You just don’t know if and when it’s going to happen.

Amy: Every woman, to varying degrees has.. it’s very emotional when you have a child. I mean the hormones in your body, the estrogen, there is something called Baby Blues which isn’t Postpartum Depression and so postpartum depression is just like baby blues, that just doesn’t go away, it gets worse. I started writing [ A Mouthful of Air] 20 years ago, it was impossible to get published, and I think every single agent in NYC rejected that book and they all said, “No one wants to read about this.” I remember, I’m so sick, that when Andrea Yates killed her children, I don’t know if you remember that? I remember seeing it on the cover of Newsweek and calling one of  the agents and going, “See?! This is a real thing!.” And she said, “Well this isn’t going to make it any easier for you, it’s going to make it worse.” So, I’m really happy to see that people talk about it more now. When I wrote that book, people say it’s a book on postpartum, I never even knew the words postpartum depression even existed. I just thought it was a variation on the theme of depression. I didn’t know there was this separate world of this kind of depression. I remember after writing the final scene… I remember going online and reading, I don’t even think it  was Google, I think it was Ask Jeeves!… it was the first time I saw the words “postpartum depression” and it was on a very rudimentary site where some mother was writing about how her daughter had killed herself, not the child. Slowly through that book, I met a lot of people who were working really hard to bring awareness. It’s much better that people know to look out for it. People know with their friends, they can spot it. They know the difference between when the person is having emotional stuff happen because they have just had a baby versus, “Oh, that’s something different.” And they need an different level of help. A Mouthful of Air is actually out of print now but you can get it for free on my website. (www.AmyKoppelman.com) You can print it out at home or you can get it as an eBook. I might as well have it there, because the most rewarding thing for me, even though I don’t sell a lot of books, is when I get letters from psychiatrists or from people who say, “I gave this to my patient’s husband, so that they could understand what’s going on with their wife.” Or, “I gave this to my patient’s mother so they could help get their child to take medication.”

Liz: I think that’s so generous of you.

Before they steal you, HESITATION WOUNDS! (Amy’s new novel) I think it’s  so interesting that you’re coming from a psychiatrist’s point of view in this respect. I think that’s a really interesting way to tackle the subject of depression.

Amy: I think that one of the things that Susa Seliger says, (The main character in the novel) she says that even though she knows so much about the human mind, it doesn’t really help her in terms of being a human being. It doesn’t make it easier for her to deal with regret and fear and mourning and anger. The guilt for having survived. And, I hope you like it!

hesitation wounds coverHESITATION WOUNDS Synopsis:
The new novel by the author of I Smile Back, now a film starring Sarah Silverman.The acclaimed author of I Smile Back, Amy Koppelman is a novelist of astonishing power, with a sly, dark voice, at once fearless and poetic. In her breathtaking new novel, Dr. Susanna Seliger is a renowned psychiatrist with a specialty in treatment-resistant depression. The most difficult cases come through her door, and Susa will happily discuss medication or symptom management but draws the line at messy feeling. Her mantra and most fervent anti-prayer, and the undeniable fact of her past is that the people who love you leave.But the past is made present by one patient, Jim, whose struggles  tear open Susa’s hastily stitched up wounds, and she’s once again haunted by the feeling she could have saved those she’s lost, including her adored, cool, talented graffiti-artist brother. Spectacularly original, gorgeously unsettling, Hesitation Wounds is a wondrous novel that will sink deep and remain—powerfully, transformingly, like a persistent scar or a dangerous glow-in-the-dark memory.
i smile back posterI SMILE BACK  is in theaters now and will be On Demand this Friday, November 6th.

Hesitation Wounds comes to shelves tomorrow, November 3rd!

New York Film Festival Review: ‘STEVE JOBS’ The idol and the narcissist.

SteveJobs-NYFF53-fullSteve Jobs posterSteve Jobs: Humanity may recognize his face quicker than any religious leader, sports icon, historical figure… even Kardashian. The world knows this man. But, do they really?  Danny Boyle‘s new film, based upon the biography by Walter Isaacson, focuses on three specific moments in the life of Jobs; the launches of the Macintosh, Next, and the iMac. You may think you know the man that inspired the internet in your pocket, but truly you have no idea.stevejobs0004

The unmistakable dialogue from Aaron Sorkin breathes life into this film. Steve Jobs takes off running right out of the gate without a moment’s rest in it’s 122 minute run time. Each of the three sequences appearing in “real time” as they play out on screen. Sorkin admitted in the press conference following the screening that he has a bit of an obsession with time itself. The pacing is unreal. You have no idea how far you are into the movie at any given time as his dialogue is lush but never verbose. The entire cast nails each beat precisely.

steve jobs michael fassbender Lisa Still

If you haven’t read Isaacson’s book, you may not have a clear picture of Jobs. While he was adored by those in the public and those closest to him, the man was no saint. Self obsessed, “my way or the highway attitude” and in total denial, each move in his career was 1000% calculated. Oftentimes, to the detriment of those personal relationships. This is another brilliant aspect that the film brings in its editing. Each of the three launches is inter-cut with a pivotal moment from the past in which a character had a confrontation with Steve. While the adoration remains, let it be known that everyone in his path at some point reached their emotional limit and let him know it. I would be remiss to ignore the look and feel of each era, including wardrobe, music, and sporadic text visuals that serve to quietly highlight it’s excellence. Michael Stuhlbarg, Michael Fassbender, Kate Winslet Steve Jobs

This cast is beyond perfection. Michael Fassbender, who admits he looks nothing like Jobs, did his actor’s due diligence studying YouTube clips of Steve. The rhythm and timbre of his voice and his physicality. Kate Winslet plays Joanna Hoffman, Job’s head of marketing and perhaps closest female friend ever, with a delicious ease. The leftover Polish accent of Hoffman is perfectly captured on Winslet’s lips. Seth Rogen is the ever forgotten genius Steve Wozniak. Rogen’s performance should not be overlooked in this year’s awards nominations. His quiet power does not go unnoticed and the scenes between he and Fassbender are spellbinding. Jeff Daniels, who perhaps has the most experience with Sorkin’s writing with his work on The Newsroom, gives us a knockout performance as Apple CEO John Sculley. Butting heads with Jobs but revealing a while boat load of truth in the process, Daniels also deserves accolades for this role. The cast is rounded out by exceptional portrayals of Crisann Brennan, Jobs’ thrown to the wind ex and mother of his first child, by Katherine Waterston. The emotional torture this woman endured is evident in each scene. Finally, Michael Stuhlbarg is Andy Hertzfeld, Mac software system designer, who often argued with Steve about his closed source software (the reason Mac is incompatible with anything other than Mac, which was probably his most calculated decision ever). Stuhlbarg, like the majority of the cast, spent time with his real life counterpart, getting to know the true ins and outs of who they were to  Steve and who they were as individual innovators. Seth Rogen Steve JobsSTEVE JOBS is both a pretty picture and a not so pretty picture of a man the world still worships. It will take you by surprise in every way possible. A triumph from start to finish, look for, at the very least, massive nominations for all involved come award season. STEVE JOBS comes to theaters in limited release Friday, October 3rd, followed by it’s nationwide release Friday, October 23rd. Stay tuned to Reel News Daily for the latest updates.

  • Directed By Danny Boyle
  • 2015
  • USA
  • DCP

Anyone going to this provocative and wildly entertaining film expecting a straight biopic of Steve Jobs is in for a shock. Working from Walter Isaacson’s biography, writer Aaron Sorkin (The Social Network, Charlie Wilson’s War) and director Danny Boyle (Slumdog Millionaire, 127 Hours) joined forces to create this dynamically character-driven portrait of the brilliant man at the epicenter of the digital revolution, weaving the multiple threads of their protagonist’s life into three daringly extended backstage scenes, as he prepares to launch the first Macintosh, the NeXT work station and the iMac. We get a dazzlingly executed cross-hatched portrait of a complex and contradictory man, set against the changing fortunes and circumstances of the home-computer industry and the ascendancy of branding, of products, and of oneself. The stellar cast includes Michael Fassbender in the title role, Kate Winslet as Joanna Hoffman, Seth Rogen as Steve Wozniak, Jeff Daniels as John Sculley, Katherine Waterston as Chrisann Brennan and Michael Stuhlbarg as Andy Hertzfeld. A Universal Pictures release.

Liz’s Interview: Amber Benson Talks About Her New Book ‘The Witches of Echo Park’ (Link to Excerpt Too!)

Liz Whittemore & Amber Benson

Liz Whittemore & Amber Benson

Liz spoke with Amber at Midtown Comics  – listen to her interview below! Read More →